Tdap Vaccine Safe for Mother, Fetus

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 -- The Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) vaccine is safe for pregnant women who hope to pass their immunity on to their newborns, a new study shows. The vaccine does not appear to cause birth defects or any other major...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

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Conclusions Infants of mothers who received prenatal Tdap experienced half the rate of pertussis as compared with infants of unimmunized mothers. These results do not provide evidence to support changing the currently recommended timing of Tdap administration in pregnancy.
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that providers can improve Tdap and influenza vaccination acceptance in pregnancy by recommending the vaccination in combination with provision of educational materials on the vaccines. PMID: 29907484 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract Reported infant vaccination coverage at age 12 months in Australia is>90%. On-time coverage of the 2-4-6 month schedule and coverage in specific populations is rarely reported. We conducted a population-based cohort study of 1.9 million Australian births, 1996-2012, combining individual birth and perinatal records with immunisation records through probabilistic linkage. We assessed on-time coverage across 13 demographic and perinatal characteristics of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccines (DTP) defined as vaccination 14 days prior to the scheduled due date, to 30 days afterwards. On-time DTP v...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Authors: Abstract Immunization is an essential part of care for adults, including pregnant women. Influenza vaccination for pregnant women is especially important because pregnant women who contract influenza are at greater risk of maternal morbidity and mortality in addition to fetal morbidity, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. Other vaccines provide maternal protection from severe morbidity related to specific pathogens such as pneumococcus, meningococcus, and hepatitis for at-risk pregnant women. Obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care provid...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Authors: Abstract Immunization is an essential part of care for adults, including pregnant women. Influenza vaccination for pregnant women is especially important because pregnant women who contract influenza are at greater risk of maternal morbidity and mortality in addition to fetal morbidity, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. Other vaccines provide maternal protection from severe morbidity related to specific pathogens such as pneumococcus, meningococcus, and hepatitis for at-risk pregnant women. Obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care provid...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Pregnant women are at risk for infection and may have significant morbidity or mortality. Influenza, pertussis, zika, and cytomegalovirus produce mild or asymptomatic illness in the mother, but have profound implications for her fetus. Maternal immunization can prevent or mitigate infections in pregnant women and their infants. The Advisory Committee of Immunization Practices recommends 2 vaccines during pregnancy: inactivated influenza, and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis during pregnancy. The benefits of MMR, varicella, and other vaccines are reviewed. Novel vaccine studies for use duri...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
This report compiles and summarizes all recommendations from CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding prevention and control of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis in the United States. As a comprehensive summary of previously published recommendations, this report does not contain any new recommendations and replaces all previously published reports and policy notes; it is intended for use by clinicians and public health providers as a resource. ACIP recommends routine vaccination for tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Infants and young children are recommended to receive a 5-dose series of diph...
Source: MMWR Recomm Rep - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Recomm Rep Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Erratum Source Type: research
y G Abstract Pertussis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in infants and young children, and despite the availability of vaccines and pertinent national and international guidelines. The disease burden is more severe in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), especially in the African continent. Pertussis is more prevalent among young infants in Africa. Poor or no pertussis surveillance, lack of disease awareness, diagnostic limitations, and competing health priorities are considered key contributory factors for this high pertussis burden in Africa. Most African countries use whole-ce...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 003 A 65 yr old woman from Ethiopia is visiting her grandchild for the first time in Europe. She is normally fit and well, physically active with a small-holding in Ethiopia. She does not take any medication and cannot remember the last time she saw a doctor. She presents to you with difficulty chewing 3 days after arriving in the UK. She describes it as being “stiff in the mouth” Questions: Q1. What is the differential diagno...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine tetanus Source Type: blogs
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