Zika Virus May Affect Male Fertility, According To Study On Mice

CHICAGO (Reuters) - A study of mice infected with Zika showed the virus caused lasting damage to key cells in the male reproductive system, resulting in shrunken testicles, lower levels of sex hormones and reduced fertility, U.S. researchers said on Monday. So far, the findings are only in mice, but the result is worrisome enough to warrant further study because of possible implications for people, said Dr. Michael Diamond of Washington University in St. Louis, whose research was published in the journal Nature. ”It has to be corroborated,” Diamond, a professor of pathology, immunology and molecular microbiology, said in a telephone interview. Much of the global effort to fight Zika has focused on protecting pregnant women from infection because of the grave implications for their unborn children. Zika infections in pregnant women have been shown to cause microcephaly, a severe birth defect in which the head and brain are undersized, as well as other brain abnormalities. Previous studies have shown that Zika can remain in semen for as long as six months. But little is known about whether prolonged exposure to the virus in the testes can cause harm. To study this, Diamond and colleagues injected male mice with Zika. After a week, the researchers recovered infectious virus from the testes and sperm, and they found evidence of viral genes in certain cells of the testes. But overall, the testes appeared normal compared with other lab mice. After three weeks, however, ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results suggest that berberine as an anti-inflammatory agent has protective effects on LPS-induced abortion by modulation of inflammatory/immune responses. PMID: 30003821 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol Source Type: research
Conclusion: Magnesium supplementation in healthy first-time pregnant women is not to be recommended for prevention of blood pressure increase. Supplementation in risk pregnancies needs to be further investigated. The study is listed on the ISRCTN registry with study ID 13890849. PMID: 30002931 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Pregnancy - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Pregnancy Source Type: research
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 12 to July 15, 2018 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (12 updates) 12 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (122 updates) 42 Diseases80 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (22 updates) 1 New Drugs Added20 Drugs1 New Drug Synonyms Added Infectious Diseases – Vaccines (4 updates) 4 Vaccines Microbiology – Bacteria (8 updates) 3 New Bacteria Added3 New Bacteria Synonyms Added2 Microbes – Update The post Update: July 15, 2018 appeared first on GIDEON - Global Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Online Network.
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs
Authors: Tayyar AT, Tayyar A, Atakul T, Yayla CA, Kilicci C, Eser A, Karakus R, Herkiloglu D, Cundubey CR, Tayyar M Abstract Introduction: The aim of this study is to compare first- and second-trimester Down syndrome biochemical screening markers in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and normal pregnancies. Material and methods: This observational case-control study was conducted at Health Sciences University Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children's Health Training and Research Hospital and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Erciyes University Medical Faculty during 2016-2017. The study includ...
Source: Archives of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Tags: Arch Med Sci Source Type: research
AbstractSTUDY QUESTIONAre specific gravity (SG)-adjusted urinary concentrations of 3-(diethylcarbamoyl)benzoic acid (DCBA) associated with semen parameters among men attending an academic fertility center?SUMMARY ANSWEROur study did not demonstrate any association between SG-adjusted urinary DCBA concentrations and semen parameters among men attending an academic fertility center.WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADYN,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) is the most common active ingredient in consumer insect repellents. The recent rise in public health concerns regarding mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika, have led to an increased use of DEET ...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Zika virus is transmitted through mosquitoes and sexual contact and is associated with severe congenital anomalies. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that women and men traveling to Zika-affected regions (>70 countries by 2016) delay pregnancy by 8 weeks and 6 months, respectively. We hypothesized that infertile patients may be unwilling to delay conception despite these recommendations. We sought to assess knowledge of Zika virus and if such knowledge influenced reproductive planning among infertile women.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster session Source Type: research
AbstractIn the past 2  years, Zika virus has emerged from obscurity onto the world stage—traversing and transcending clinical specialties, basic science disciplines, and public health efforts. The spread of Zika virus has serious implications for the specialty of reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Our patient s, practices, and labs—worldwide and specifically in the USA—have been impacted by this teratogenic, sexually transmitted, largely asymptomatic virus. While the World Health Organization’s Public Emergency of International Concern designation has lapsed as major epidemics have sub...
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Purpose of review: Due to the fact that the Zika virus can be sexually transmitted, there is a potential risk for disease transmission at several stages of assisted reproduction. Such a possibility poses a serious challenge to couples pursing fertility with reproductive technologies. Here, we discuss what is known regarding Zika virus infection with respect to sexual transmission and correlate this knowledge with recent recommendations in the realm of infertility treatment. Recent findings: Zika virus can be transmitted from infected men and women through vaginal, oral or anal intercourse. Zika virus RNA has been detected...
Source: Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: FERTILITY, IVF AND REPRODUCTIVE GENETICS: Edited by Emre Seli and Juan Antonio Garcia Velasco Source Type: research
Nature Reviews Urology 14, 135 (2017). doi:10.1038/nrurol.2016.265 Author: Andreas Meinhardt Amongst the many causes of male-factor infertility, a diagnosed viral cause is a rather infrequent aetiological factor. However, a recent study has illustrated that Zika virus infections affect not only developing fetuses in pregnant women, but are also a threat to fertility in men. Whether this threat could be managed or mitigated remains uncertain.
Source: Nature Reviews Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: News and Views Source Type: research
The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic is particularly challenging in the field of reproductive medicine as various biological tissues and byproducts, such as intravenous immunoglobulin G or cells are utilized during reproductive cycles, and an infected mother has an increased risk of having babies with fetal microcephaly and other congenital brain anomalies. In this review, current guidelines for prevention of sexual transmission of ZIKV, ZIKV testing, and tissue and blood product usages are summarized for physicians caring for those planning pregnancy or going through infertility treatment.
Source: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Special Issue Source Type: research
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