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Five Ways to Reduce Your Breast Cancer Risk

By Stacy Simon While you can’t change some breast cancer risk factors—family history and aging, for example—there are some risk factors that you can control. And while there is no sure way to prevent breast cancer, there are things you can do that may lower your risk. Here are 5 ways to help protect your breast health. 1. Watch your weight. Being overweight or obese increases breast cancer risk. This is especially true after menopause and for women who gain weight as adults. After menopause, most of your estrogen comes from fat tissue. Having more fat tissue can increase your chance of getting breast cancer by raising estrogen levels. Also, women who are overweight tend to have higher levels of insulin, another hormone. Higher insulin levels have also been linked to some cancers, including breast cancer. If you’re already at a healthy weight, stay there. If you’re carrying extra pounds, try to lose some. There’s some evidence that losing weight may lower breast cancer risk. Losing even a small amount of weight – for example, half a pound a week – can also have other health benefits and is a good place to start. 2. Exercise regularly. Many studies have found that exercise is a breast-healthy habit. The difference in risk between the most active and the least active women is typically around 25%. In one study from the Women's Health Initiative, as little as 1.25 to 2.5 hours per week of brisk walking reduced a woman's risk by 18%....
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

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Conclusion: Use of several organophosphate insecticides was associated with elevated breast cancer risk. However, associations for the women’s and husbands’ use of these insecticides showed limited concordance. Ongoing cohort follow-up may help clarify the relationship, if any, between individual insecticide exposures and breast cancer risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1295 Received: 28 October 2016 Revised: 25 April 2017 Accepted: 08 May 2017 Published: 06 September 2017 Address correspondence to L. Engel, Dept. of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, CB #7435, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7435 USA. Telep...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: In this cohort of women with elevated risk, high serum 25(OH)D levels and regular vitamin D supplement use were associated with lower rates of incident, postmenopausal breast cancer over 5 y of follow-up. These results may help to establish clinical benchmarks for 25(OH)D levels; in addition, they support the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation is useful in breast cancer prevention. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP943 About This Article Received: 09 August 2016 Revised: 23 January 2017 Accepted: 06 February 2017 Published: 06 July 2017 Address correspondence to C. R. Weinberg, 111 TW Alexander Dr., Rese...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
This article reviews the major modifiable risk factors for breast cancer and describes how these factors can affect the incidence of cancer in women. This information shows that modifiable risk factors (such as physical activity, diet, obesity, and use of alcohol and tobacco) can influence the occurrence of breast cancer, in part depending on the life stage of a woman, including menopausal status. Timely prevention at the primary care level is one of the most important areas on which health professionals need to focus in order to help reduce the incidence of breast cancer. PMID: 28614486 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Pan American Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rev Panam Salud Publica Source Type: research
This article investigated different dimensions of breast cancer and its associated factors. It revealed that breast cancer was and continues to be among the most prevalent and growing malignant diseases among Iranian women in the past four decades. In this article, required information was collected through literature review and keyword (cancer, breast cancer, cell, gene, life quality, women, prevalence, productivity, age, obesity, alcohol, cigarette, menopause, genetic, Cytokine, and mortality) query in credible scientific websites such as SID, Google Scholar, and comprehensive portal of human sciences. This disease affec...
Source: Journal of Medicine and Life - Category: Journals (General) Tags: J Med Life Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeTo explore the associations between lifestyle-related factors and tumor-related prognostic factors in women treated for primary breast cancer, and to detect possible differences between the associations in pre- and postmenopausal women.MethodsAssociations between tumor-related prognostic factors, including the composite endpoint risk of recurrence (RoR), body mass index (BMI), comorbidity (Charlson comorbidity index), basic physical functioning (SF-36), physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption were examined with binary logistic regression analysis in a national cohort of 4917 women treated for pri...
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Modifiable lifestyle factors may reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. Obesity is associated particularly with post-menopausal breast cancer. Diet is important, and exercise equivalent to running for up to 8 hours each week reduces the risk of breast cancer, both in its own right and through reducing obesity. Alcohol consumption may be responsible for 5.8% of breast cancers in Australia and it is recommended to reduce this to two standard drinks per day. Drinking alcohol and smoking increases the risk for breast cancer and, therefore, it is important to quit tobacco smoking. Prolonged use of combin...
Source: Med J Aust - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Med J Aust Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis large study carried out in Mediterranean women confirms the role of PA, BMI, and alcohol consumption in modulating post-menopausal BC risk and supports the potential benefits obtainable by modifying these lifestyle factors.
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion This study shows a link between the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone HRT and breast cancer risk, particularly among women who take the pill for a long period of time. But this is not the entire story. The study included a large cohort of women. The risk increase for combined HRT is based on only 52 of the 39,183 women taking the combined pill who developed breast cancer. Of these, only seven women had been taking the pill for more than 15 years. Therefore, the analysis was based on a very small number, which may mean the risk associations are not completely accurate....
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Older people Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The Western dietary pattern was associated with increased mammographic density among overweight-obese women. Our results might inform specific dietary recommendations for women with high mammographic density. PMID: 27500335 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
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