Treating Insomnia Benefits Work Outcomes

Insomnia is running rampant through contemporary society. Large scale studies estimate the prevalence of insomnia of around 25%-30% of adults in the United States and Canada. This is a big health problem, but it is also a work problem. Accumulating evidence indicates that insomnia undermines not only the health and well-being of employees, but also their effectiveness in their jobs. Research indicates that insomnia leads to hostility at work, low job satisfaction , high levels of unethical behavior , high levels of cyberloafing , and even abusive supervision behavior by leaders . Thus, employee insomnia is an issue that employers should care about. Good employers care about the health and well-being of their employees simply because they value people. But ALL employers care about the effectiveness of their employees. This opens a very important question: What can employers do about insomnia? Educating employees about which behaviors are consistent with a good night of sleep (referred to as sleep hygiene) is a good start, but not enough. Taking steps to make the workplace a less stressful and anxiety-inducing environment will also help, but this does not influence the stress and anxiety people face outside of the workplace. So what else can be done? My coauthors (Jared Miller here at the University of Washington, and Sophie Bostock from Big Health and the University of Oxford) and I sought an answer to this question. But to get there, we started with the question of whether ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news