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How To Protect Your Eyesight

If you’re one of the 40% of Americans who wears glasses or contact lenses for distance viewing, you probably believe your bad vision is genetic. It’s not. But the belief that myopia — or nearsightedness — is hereditary is so prevalent that no one even questions it. If you have trouble seeing faraway objects, you’ll just be given a prescription for glasses. Your eye doctor isn’t interested in finding out the true cause of your poor eyesight. Myopia Epidemic And that’s a shame, because the rates of myopia are rising in epidemic proportions around the world. It’s even worse in Asia than it is in the U.S. About 90% of young people there are nearsighted! That proves it’s not genetic! As obvious as that seems, doctors are still misleading their patients. This is a modern problem. Our primal ancestors had perfect vision. They needed to so they could hunt for food. And when I visit native tribes in remote villages, I don’t find many people at all who have myopia. In fact, studies show that among indigenous people, rates of myopia are extremely low. But as modern culture reaches these tribes, rates shoot up. In a study of Inuit people on the northern tip of Alaska, only 2 out of 131 had myopia. But more than half of their children and grandchildren had the condition.1 So what’s going on?  For one thing, the human eye is designed for distance view­ing. When you look out 20 feet or more, light enters your eye n...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: news

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