How Medical Tattoos Can Help People With Skin Grafts And Scars

By Lisa Rapaport(Reuters Health) - Patients who get tattoos to cover facial skin grafts and scars may feel happier with both their appearance and quality of life, a Dutch study suggests. The practice of using tattoos to cover damaged skin isn’t that new. Doctors even have a term for it: dermatography. These medical tattoos are not butterflies or lightning bolts; rather doctors use subtle coloration to make discolored areas match surrounding skin more closely. While it doesn’t cure disease, cosmetic changes made by tattoo needles can still have lasting health benefits, said one of the study’s authors, Dr. Rick van de Langenberg. “Scar and skin graft color abnormalities can result in impaired physical, psychological, and social well-being, especially in the facial area that is constantly visible to the patient and others,” van de Langenberg, a researcher at Diakonessen Hospital in Utrecht, said by email. For the study, researchers focused on 76 patients who received medical tattoos to cover scars and skin grafts left on the head and neck after cancer treatment. Most of the patients were female, and the participants ranged in age from 19 to 86. Many of the participants had skin cancer or melanoma, though some had oral or thyroid tumors or other types of malignancies. Researchers asked patients to rate how their scar or graft looked on a 10-point scale, with zero as “very ugly” and 10 as “very nice,” before and after they got ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In this study, five population databases plus the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer was employed to demonstrate the impact of changing the PF cut-off on assignment of variants as germline versus somatic. The 1% to 2% PF cut-offs widely used in bioinformatic pipelines result in high sensitivity for classification of somatic variants, but unnecessarily reduced sensitivity for germline variants. Using optimized PF cut-offs, the source of variants in TCGA data could be predicted with>95% accuracy. Further exploration of four TCGA cancer datasets indicated that the optimal cut-off is influenced by both cancer type and t...
Source: The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 June 2019Source: The Journal of Molecular DiagnosticsAuthor(s): Paolo A. Ascierto, Carlo Bifulco, Giuseppe Palmieri, Solange Peters, Nikoletta SidiropoulosAn enduring goal of personalized medicine in cancer is the ability to identify patients who are likely to respond to specific therapies. Our growing understanding of the biology and molecular signatures of individual tumor types has facilitated the identification of predictive biomarkers and has led to an increasing number of diagnostic tests to be performed, often as serial and distinct assays on limited tumor specimens. The biomark...
Source: The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
Objective The aim of this study was to use an electronic tablet–based education module to increase patient knowledge about human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods Patients presenting to an academic colposcopy clinic were first queried as to whether they had been infected with HPV. A quality improvement project was then conducted using a 4-question pretest assessing baseline knowledge about HPV and cancer, followed by a tablet-based education module and a 5-question posttest. Results Between June 2017 and January 2018, 119 patients participated in the tablet education. At their initial visit, only 50 (42.0%) of pa...
Source: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Research Articles: Cervix and HPV Source Type: research
Conclusions Both methods of sampling were found to be acceptable to women. Self-sampling is cost-effective and could increase the screening coverage among underscreened populations. However, more information about the quality, reliability, and accuracy of self-sampling is needed to increase women's confidence about using to this method.
Source: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Research Articles: Cervix and HPV Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease - Category: OBGYN Tags: Forum Source Type: research
Conclusions We reviewed and discussed unusual benign and malignant dermatopathology conditions that can affect the foreskin.
Source: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease - Category: OBGYN Tags: Review Source Type: research
Santosh K. Ghosh1*, Thomas S. McCormick1,2 and Aaron Weinberg1* 1Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States 2Dermatology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States Human beta-defensins (hBDs, −1, 2, 3) are a family of epithelial cell derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that protect mucosal membranes from microbial challenges. In addition to their antimicrobial activities, they possess other functions; e.g., cell activation, proliferation, regulation of cytokine/chemokine production, migration, diffe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Opinion statementSecond malignancies are a rare but well-defined late complication after autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (SCT). Solid malignancies occur in up to 15% of patients 15  years after SCT with myeloablative conditioning, with no plateau in the incidence rates. They are responsible for 5–10% of late deaths after SCT. The incidence is increased with advanced age at SCT. The major risk factors are the use of total body irradiation, which is associated with adenocarci nomas and with chronic graft-versus-host disease which is associated with squamous cell cancers. There is ...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
By Lisa Rapaport(Reuters Health) - Patients who get tattoos to cover facial skin grafts and scars may feel happier with both their appearance and quality of life, a Dutch study suggests. The practice of using tattoos to cover damaged skin isn’t that new. Doctors even have a term for it: dermatography. These medical tattoos are not butterflies or lightning bolts; rather doctors use subtle coloration to make discolored areas match surrounding skin more closely. While it doesn’t cure disease, cosmetic changes made by tattoo needles can still have lasting health benefits, said one of the study’s authors, Dr. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
This study examines historical trends in adjuvant and neoadjuvant radiation therapy (ANRT) before or after cancer-directed surgery to identify disease sites that may benefit from coordinated care. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried to identify patients with bladder cancer; breast cancer; cervical cancer; colorectal cancer; kidney cancer; cancer of the lung, bronchus, and pleura; lymphoma; melanoma; cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx; ovarian cancer; pancreatic cancer; prostate cancer; thyroid cancer; and uterine cancer from 1973 to 2011. Number and percentage of patients who re...
Source: The Cancer Journal - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
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