[Report] Drosophila insulin release is triggered by adipose Stunted ligand to brain Methuselah receptor

Animals adapt their growth rate and body size to available nutrients by a general modulation of insulin–insulin-like growth factor signaling. In Drosophila, dietary amino acids promote the release in the hemolymph of brain insulin-like peptides (Dilps), which in turn activate systemic organ growth. Dilp secretion by insulin-producing cells involves a relay through unknown cytokines produced by fat cells. Here, we identify Methuselah (Mth) as a secretin-incretin receptor subfamily member required in the insulin-producing cells for proper nutrient coupling. We further show, using genetic and ex vivo organ culture experiments, that the Mth ligand Stunted (Sun) is a circulating insulinotropic peptide produced by fat cells. Therefore, Sun and Mth define a new cross-organ circuitry that modulates physiological insulin levels in response to nutrients. Authors: Renald Delanoue, Eleonora Meschi, Neha Agrawal, Alessandra Mauri, Yonit Tsatskis, Helen McNeill, Pierre Léopold
Source: ScienceNOW - Category: Science Authors: Source Type: news