New treatment strategy could cut Parkinson's disease off at the pass

Researchers report they have identified a protein that enables a toxic natural aggregate to spread from cell to cell in a mammal's brain -- and a way to block that protein's action. Their study in mice and cultured cells suggests that an immunotherapy already in clinical trials as a cancer therapy should also be tested as a way to slow the progress of Parkinson's disease, the researchers say.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Authors: Wipfler K, Cornish AS, Guda C Abstract Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and the deadliest type of primary brain tumor, with a median survival time of only 15 months despite aggressive treatment. Although most patients have an extremely poor prognosis, a relatively small number of patients survive far beyond the median survival time. Investigation of these exceptional responders has sparked a great deal of interest and is becoming an important focus in the field of cancer research. To investigate the molecular differences between typical and exceptional responders in GBM, comparative analyses of somati...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: Molecular Aspects of Medicine, Volume 62Author(s): Susmita Sil, Palsamy Periyasamy, Annadurai Thangaraj, Ernest T. Chivero, Shilpa BuchAbstractPlatelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) are expressed in several cell types including the brain cells such as neuronal progenitors, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Emerging evidence shows that PDGF-mediated signaling regulates diverse functions in the central nervous system (CNS) such as neurogenesis, cell survival, synaptogenesis, modulation of ligand-gated ion channels, and development of specific types o...
Source: Molecular Aspects of Medicine - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2018Source: Advances in Biological Regulation, Volume 67Author(s): Fumio Sakane, Satoru Mizuno, Daisuke Takahashi, Hiromichi SakaiAbstractDiacylglycerol kinase (DGK) phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). Mammalian DGK comprises ten isozymes (α–κ) and regulates a wide variety of physiological and pathological events, such as cancer, type II diabetes, neuronal disorders and immune responses. DG and PA consist of various molecular species that have different acyl chains at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions, and consequently, mammalian cells contain at least...
Source: Advances in Biological Regulation - Category: Biology Source Type: research
In this study, senescent cell distribution and quantity in vastus lateralis muscle were examined in young human adults after a single bout of resistance exercise. To determine the effects of dietary protein availability around exercise on senescent cell quantity and macrophage infiltration of skeletal muscle, two isocaloric protein supplements (14% and 44% in calorie) were ingested before and immediately after an acute bout of resistance exercise, in a counter-balanced crossover fashion. An additional parallel trial was conducted to compare the outcome of muscle mass increment under the same dietary conditions after 12 wee...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: January 2018Source: Advances in Biological Regulation, Volume 67Author(s): Fumio Sakane, Satoru Mizuno, Daisuke Takahashi, Hiromichi SakaiAbstractDiacylglycerol kinase (DGK) phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). Mammalian DGK comprises ten isozymes (α–κ) and regulates a wide variety of physiological and pathological events, such as cancer, type II diabetes, neuronal disorders and immune responses. DG and PA consist of various molecular species that have different acyl chains at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions, and consequently, mammalian cells contain at least...
Source: Advances in Biological Regulation - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: Molecular Aspects of Medicine, Volume 62Author(s): Susmita Sil, Palsamy Periyasamy, Annadurai Thangaraj, Ernest T. Chivero, Shilpa BuchAbstractPlatelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) are expressed in several cell types including the brain cells such as neuronal progenitors, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Emerging evidence shows that PDGF-mediated signaling regulates diverse functions in the central nervous system (CNS) such as neurogenesis, cell survival, synaptogenesis, modulation of ligand-gated ion channels, and development of specific types o...
Source: Molecular Aspects of Medicine - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Various forms of glial cell exist in the brain, supporting and protecting neurons. Over the years, researchers have discovered that glial cells are deeply involved in many of the important functions of neurons, such as the establishment and maintenance of synaptic connections. Some forms of glial cell, such as microglia, are a part of the innate immune system. They differ in many aspects from similar types of immune cell elsewhere in the body, macrophages, but have much the same set of responsibilities: clean up debris; consume pathogens; destroy errant cells; assist in regeneration from injury. In the aging brain, immune ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Johnson &Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) opened its latest life science incubator in New York City, the healthcare giant said today. The 30,000-square-foot JLabs @ NYC is a collaboration between Johnson &Johnson Innovation, New York State and the New York Genome Center. Sited at the genome center in SoHo, the incubator is home to 26 startups and has room for four more, New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J said. “Johnson &Johnson has deep entrepreneurial roots in New York and we are pleased to see our unique JLabs model applied in this rich ecosystem to foster the creation of new healthcare innovations that have the pote...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Funding Roundup Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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