The Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

The Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Rev Cardiovasc Med. 2016;17(1-2):57-64 Authors: Marchesini M, Uguccioni L, Parisi R, Mattioli G, Terzi F, Olivieri R, Capucci A, Fattori R Abstract Until recently, the only imaging technique for the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was two-dimensional echocardiography, and the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) was limited to patients with poor acoustic windows. Now, cMRI has gained an essential role in the diagnosis of HCM, providing superior visualization of myocardial hypertrophy-even in remote zones of the left ventricle-and visualization of subtle changes in thickness and contractility over time. The morphologic accuracy of cMRI allows for the differentiation of HCM from other pathologic conditions with hypertrophic phenotype. Moreover, cMRI sheds light on the in vivo fibrotic changes in cardiac ultrastructure, offering an important advantage in the understanding of pathologic mechanisms of the disease, allowing early identification, risk stratification, and timely therapeutic management. PMID: 27667381 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research

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Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
This study aimed to investigate association between deep T ‐wave inversion (TWI) and apical HCM, and between fragmented QRS (fQRS) complex and myocardial fibrosis in patients with HCM.MethodsPatients with documented HCM by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) during 2005 –2015 were studied. The 12‐lead ECG and CMR were performed on the same day. All patients underwent CMR for the assessment of cardiac structure, function, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). LGE was used to detect myocardial fibrosis.ResultsOne hundred forty ‐four HCM (mean age 66 ± 15.8 years, 60.4% male) were inclu...
Source: Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
ConclusionsConfidence with the anatomic pattern and clinical significance of this anomalous condition is necessary to improve cardiac imaging evaluation ability. In our patient, coronary computed tomographic angiography proved to be a reliable imaging approach, superior to invasive coronary angiography in terms of diagnostic performance and patient safety.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionsMany causes of myocardial thickening may mimic different HCM phenotypes. The unique ability of cardiac MRI to facilitate tissue characterisation may help to establish the aetiology of myocardial thickening, which is essential to differentiate it from HCM phenotypes and for appropriate management.Teaching points•Many causes of myocardial thickening may mimic different HCM phenotypes.•Differential diagnosis between myocardial thickening aetiology and HCM phenotypes may be challenging.•Cardiac MRI is essential to differentiate the aetiology of myocardial thickening from HCM phenotypes.
Source: Insights into Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
AbstractAlthough, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a gold standard for risk stratification of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), is limited in some situations. We sought to evaluate the predictive power of quantitative electrocardiography in assessing hypertrophy pattern and fibrosis in HCM. Eighty-eight patients with HCM were studied. Voltage of R –S–T waves, number of fragmented QRS (fQRS) complexes, and T wave morphology were measured by 12-lead electrocardiography. Sixteen segmental thickness, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), native T1, extracellular volume fraction (ECV), and T2, left ventricu...
Source: The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, EarlyView.
Source: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Boban M, Pesa V, Persic V, Zulj M, Malcic I, Beck N, Vcev A Abstract BACKGROUND Dilatation and other infrastructural rearrangements of the left ventricle are connected with poor prognosis. The aim of our study was to analyze the overlapping phenotypes and dilatation of the ventricle on impairment of systolic function and existence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). MATERIAL AND METHODS Consecutive sample of cases with dilated left ventricle due to non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and healthy controls were included from our cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) database for a period of 3 years (n=1551 exam...
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
We report a case of a 36-year-old man presenting with a chief complaint of progressively worsening exertional dyspnea. He had demonstrated labile systolic murmur for more than 3 years. Rest echocardiography revealed coexistence of a solitary main PM hypertrophy and additional accessory PM with no left ventricular outflow tract or mid ventricle obstructions. The patient underwent exercise stress echocardiography unmasking severe mid-ventricle obstruction (peak systolic gradient at exercise of 100 mmHg). There was no obvious parietal hypertrophy elsewhere. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provided us with anatomical a...
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
We report a case of a 36-year-old man presenting with a chief complaint of progressively worsening exertional dyspnea. He had demonstrated labile systolic murmur for more than 3 years. Rest echocardiography revealed coexistence of a solitary main PM hypertrophy and additional accessory PM with no left ventricular outflow tract or mid ventricle obstructions. The patient underwent exercise stress echocardiography unmasking severe mid-ventricle obstruction (peak systolic gradient at exercise of 100mmHg). There was no obvious parietal hypertrophy elsewhere. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provided us with anatomical argumen...
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
We present a case of athletic heart in an exceptionally physically fit active duty naval aviator who experienced syncope and underwent extensive cardiac testing. He was found to have borderline hypertrophic changes as well as delayed gadolinium enhancement initially concerning for myocarditis. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing revealed an exercise capacity of 120% above the maximum measurable value for his age and gender. He was then diagnosed with athlete's heart and released to active duty with no limitations to his flight status. A challenge is posed to the practicing clinician in differentiating the athletic heart from ...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
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