6 Brain Boosting Foods You Need To Eat Now

Summer is coming to a close, which means school and work are ramping up again - and you want your brain to be in tip top shape to tackle important tasks and projects. Did you know that there are specific foods you can incorporate into your diet to increase your cognitive abilities such as focus, memory, problem solving skills and learning? Research has shown that certain nutrients can enhance brain function by increasing blood flow to the brain, calming inflammation and battling fatigue. Here are my top six brain boosting foods to keep you sharp, focused and on point. 1. Beets: These beautiful root vegetables have tremendous brain boosting potential because of the natural nitrates they contain. Some studies show that these nitrates increase blood flow to the brain, enhancing mental performance. My favorite way to eat beets is to roast (you lose much fewer nutrients this way than by boiling) and drizzle them with some extra virgin olive oil, Icelandic flake salt and fresh ground pepper. 2. Almonds: Nutritional powerhouses, almonds are high in Vitamin E, heart-healthy mono-unsaturated fats, fiber and protein. Vitamin E has been shown to help reduce the risk of cognitive impairment and potentially even the decline caused by Alzheimer's. An easy way to eat almonds is to pre-portion them out (one small handful is the ideal serving size) and keep them in your car, desk and bag for a healthy snack or to swap out peanut butter for almond butter. 3. Celery: Fibrous, crunchy cel...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Abstract Several plant bioactive compounds have exhibited functional activities that suggest they could play a remarkable role in preventing a wide range of chronic diseases. The largest group of naturally-occurring polyphenols are the flavonoids, including apigenin. The present work is an updated overview of apigenin, focusing on its health-promoting effects/therapeutic functions and, in particular, results of in vivo research. In addition to an introduction to its chemistry, nutraceutical features have also been described. The main key findings from in vivo research, including animal models and human studies, ar...
Source: Molecular Medicine - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Int J Mol Sci Source Type: research
In conclusion, this study suggested that Res may reduce Aβ‑induced neuronal damage, thus preventing memory loss. PMID: 30864708 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) — They say “the eyes are the windows to the soul” and researchers at Duke University say a quick eye exam could one day identify patients at risk for Alzheimer’s disease long before symptoms begin. When an eye doctor examines the back of your eye, they are literally looking at a part of your brain: your retina. Typically, they can see a network of tiny blood vessels but researchers identified a change that could signal early Alzheimer’s. They looked at the retinas of 200 people using a new non-invasive technology that takes high-resolution images of the retina. They found that in ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Alzheimer's Disease Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News HealthWatch Source Type: news
Authors: Tang J, Oliveros A, Jang MH Abstract Synapses are sites of high energy demand which are dependent on high levels of mitochondrial derived adenosine triphosphate. Mitochondria within synaptic structures are key for maintenance of functional neurotransmission and this critical biological process is modulated by energy metabolism, mitochondrial distribution, mitochondrial trafficking, and cellular synaptic calcium flux. Synapse loss is presumed to be an early yet progressive pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), resulting in impaired cognitive function and memory loss which is particularly prevalent a...
Source: International Neurourology Journal - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Int Neurourol J Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) — A new study from the Mayo Clinic finds that people with sleep apnea may have higher accumulations of a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease in their brains. People with obstructive sleep apnea stop breathing periodically while sleeping which can cause a variety of health issues. Researchers looked at 288 people over 65 without dementia. Those whose bed partners said they stopped breathing while sleeping had a 4 1/2 percent higher level of tau in their brains than people without witnessed sleep apnea. Tau is a protein that clumps in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s which co...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Alzheimer’s Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV Sleep Apnea Source Type: news
PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE TRAINING ARE ABLE TO PREVENT RECOGNITION MEMORY DEFICITS RELATED TO AMYLOID BETA NEUROTOXICITY. Behav Brain Res. 2019 Mar 04;: Authors: Rossi Dare L, Garcia A, Alves N, Ventura Dias D, de Souza MA, Mello-Carpes PB Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ), oxidative damage and neuronal degeneration, which, together with other pathological events, promote progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Non-pharmacological strategies have been study to provide some protection against the development of AD. Considering that physic...
Source: Behavioural Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Brain Res Source Type: research
Incurable and increasingly prevalent, Alzheimer ’s has long puzzled the research community. Now scientists believe the human body may be the best line of defenceHalf a million people in the UK areliving with Alzheimer ’s disease, the most common form of dementia. And while the risks generally increase with age, thousands are afflicted under the age of 65. Inheritable genetic conditions can lead to familial Alzheimer ’s, which can afflict people as young as 30.There is no known cure. Some medications can reduce memory loss and aid concentration, but these merely alleviate the symptoms or boost the performa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Medical research Health Immunology Society UK news Vaccines and immunisation Science Source Type: news
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD), characterized by memory loss, cognitive decline, and dementia, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Although the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently been identified to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD, the specific effects of lncRNAs in AD remain unclear. In present study, we have investigated the expression profiles of lncRNAs in hippocampal of intranasal LPS-mediated Alzheimer's disease models in mice by microarray method. A total of 395 lncRNAs and 123 mRNAs was detected to express differently in AD models and controls (>2.0 folds, p
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(Bloomberg) — Taking a young person’s plasma and infusing it into an older person to ward off aging — a therapy that’s fascinated some of the biggest names in Silicon Valley — has no proven clinical benefit, the Food and Drug Administration said. The agency issued a safety alert on Tuesday about the infusion of plasma from young donors for the prevention of conditions such as aging or memory loss, or for the treatment of such conditions as dementia, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease or post‐traumatic stress disorder. “There is no pr...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Bloomberg Food and Drug Administration onetime Source Type: news
More News: Almonds | Alzheimer's | Amnesia | Brain | Calcium | Cardiology | Chemistry | Chocolate | Cocoa | Heart | Iceland Health | Learning | Men | Neurology | Nutrition | Study | Universities & Medical Training | Unsaturated fat | Vitamins | Websites