This Teen Is Almost 8 Feet Tall -- And Still Growing

At 7 feet 8 inches, Broc Brown definitely sticks out in a crowd, and he’s only going to get bigger. Brown’s family knew something was up at a young age: He was 5-foot-2 in kindergarten, according to his mother, Darci Elliot. “When he got into middle school he was around 6 feet tall, and by high school he was 7 feet tall,” Elliot told Barcroft TV. “It’s a genetic disorder and there’s nothing that can stop him from growing – I don’t know if he will ever stop.” Brown, 19, grows an astounding six inches a year because of a rare genetic disorder called Sotos syndrome, or cerebral gigantism. The condition reportedly affects 1 in 14,000 newborns, but the National Institutes of Health says the number may be closer to 1 in 5,000, since not everyone who has it is properly diagnosed. Kids with the syndrome tend to grow quickly in younger years and have unusually large heads, but their adult height is often in the normal range. That makes Brown a rarity among rarities. Other symptoms include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and an explosive temper. Brown has both, his mother said. “When he gets mad, he’s mad. It wouldn’t take him two seconds to pop a hole in the wall ― it could be very dangerous if he wasn’t on medication and able to be calmed,” Elliot told Barcroft TV. “But overall, he is a big softie, his heart is as big as his body.” Brown is in cons...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In this study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography, the Alvarado score, mean platelet volume and C-reactive protein in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients admitted to the pediatric emergency department with abdominal pain who were operated on with a preliminary diagnosis of acute appendicitis were evaluated. The patients who had acute appendicitis diagnosis in the histopathological assessment were considered as the Appendicitis (App) Group, while patients who did not have acute appendicitis according to histopathology were considered as the Non-app Group. Of 200 patients assessed in...
Source: The Turkish Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Turk J Pediatr Source Type: research
This study suggested that GP and RLS are not more common in pediatric FMF patients than their healthy peers. PMID: 30325122 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Turkish Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Turk J Pediatr Source Type: research
In this study; we aimed to analyze the demographic characteristics, etiology, outcome and incidence of AP among hospitalized children in our center. Medical records of the children with AP since January 2005 were analyzed from hospital files (N=63). Major etiologies were systemic diseases (14.3%), trauma (11.1%), cholelithiasis (9.5%); 54% (N=34) of the patients had mild AP, while 28.6% (N=18) had moderately severe AP and 17.4% (N=11) had severe AP. Organ dysfunction was found in 11 patients (17.4%) at initial examination. During the follow-up period (68.1±24.3 months), 10 patients (15.9%) experienced 24 recurring A...
Source: The Turkish Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Turk J Pediatr Source Type: research
PROSTATE cancer symptoms don ’t always appear in the early stages until the tumour has grown and put pressure on other parts of the body. When this happens, pain in certain parts of the body may begin to show.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
VITAMIN D deficiency is a common condition during the autumn and winter months, but how do you know if you have it? Pressing a certain part of the body to see if you feel pain can be one of the symptoms.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
PROSTATE cancer symptoms don ’t always appear in the early stages until the tumour has grown and put pressure on other parts of the body. When this happens, pain in certain parts of the body may begin to show.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: November 2018Source: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, Volume 44, Issue 11Author(s): Yvette Jaffe, Juan McDonnell, Fawzia Imtiaz-Crosbie, Victor Jaffe
Source: European Journal of Surgical Oncology (EJSO) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsNeedle position is not significantly associated with contrast flow directionality during CT-guided TFESI, although there was a trend towards relatively decreased central flow with posterolateral positioning. Degree of foraminal stenosis and volume of injected contrast did not affect contrast flow directionality. There was no difference in immediate post-procedural pain scores with either direction of contrast flow.
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
We present a case of one patient with radial sided wrist pain and a partial FCRB tear, which to our knowledge is the first case report of a symptomatic FCRB tear. We also review existing literature regarding FCRB anatomy, particularly related to intra-operative dissection and exposure. Identification of an anomalous FCRB on imaging may serve to guide clinicians in their differential diagnosis of r adial-sided wrist pain, in which FCRB pathological conditions ought to be included.
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsGender, age, BMI, duration of symptoms, and radiographic severity of disease do not predict injection response. Due to high surgical rates and poor response, intraarticular hip steroid injections may be less effective in the long term, and surgical management may be considered earlier.
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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