Exasperated Mom Issues PSA About What To Say To Pregnant Women

A fed-up blogger is schooling the internet on pregnancy etiquette. Jill Krause, who blogs about parenting at Baby Rabies, posted a spot-on video to Facebook called “What (Not) To Say To A Pregnant Woman.” In the video, Krause, who is pregnant herself, offers a simple “suggestion” to people who are not pregnant. “The next time you are so taken aback by a pregnant woman’s appearance that you feel the need to say something to her, this is all you’re allowed to say,” she explains. The phrase in question: “You look amazing.”  “I don’t care if she looks like Jabba the Hutt incubating a small planet,” Krause adds. “You look amazing.” According to the mom, the alternative option is to shut the hell up.   Krause wrote in the caption that she made this video in response to a stranger who approached her in the grocery store, demanded to know her due date and then rudely responded “Damn, girl. You SURE it’s not twins?!” before walking away. She said the video also goes out to anyone who believes they have the right to comment on a woman’s body, simply because she’s pregnant. Krause wrote: “There is no other human condition in which it seems to be acceptable for a stranger to approach someone and make comments about their body. I mean, I could have asked that guy if he was SURE he wasn’t drinking a 6 pack a night based on his beer gut, bu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 007 When you think tropical medicine, malaria has to be near the top. It can be fairly complex and fortunately treatment has become a lot simpler. This post is designed to walk you through the basic principals with links to more in depth teaching if your niche is travel medicine, laboratory diagnostics or management of severe or cerebral malaria. If you stubbled on this post while drinking a cup of tea or sitting on the throne and want a fe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine malaria Plasmodium plasmodium falciparum plasmodium knowles plasmodium malariae plasmodium ovale plasmodium vivax Source Type: blogs
Abstract Human rabies deaths are preventable through prompt administration of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) with rabies immune globulin and rabies vaccine after exposure to a rabid animal (1); there are no known contraindications to receiving PEP (1,2). Despite widespread availability of PEP in Vietnam, in 2015 the Ministry of Health (MoH) received reports of pregnant and breastfeeding women with clinically diagnosed rabies. MoH investigated factors associated with these rabies cases. MoH found that, during 2015-2016, among 169 cases reported in Vietnam, two probable cases of rabies were reported in breastfeeding...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Source Type: news
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 225. Question 1 Who Wrote:“Scepticaemia, an uncommon generalised disorder of low infectivity. Medical school likely to confer lifelong immunity”? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1938144804'));expand(document.g...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Alfred Jones bats DVT gastric emptying Lister liverpool school of tropical medicine LSTM marathon running Petr Skrabanek pregnancy rabies Ronald Ross Scepticaemia Source Type: blogs
by Stella Mazeri, Andrew D Gibson, Natascha Meunier, Barend M.deC Bronsvoort, Ian G Handel, Richard J Mellanby, Luke Gamble Rabies is a devastating yet preventable disease that causes around 59,000 human deaths annually. Almost all human rabies cases are caused by bites from rabies-infected dogs. A large proportion of these cases occur in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA). Annual vaccination of at least 70% of the dog populatio n is recommended by the World Health Organisation in order to eliminate rabies. However, achieving such high vaccination coverage has proven challenging, especially in low resource settings. Despite being l...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Primary care services should be reorganized and integrated with public health services. PMID: 29243549 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of General Practice - Category: Primary Care Tags: Eur J Gen Pract Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThis review highlights current knowledge in travel-related neuroinfectious diseases, providing insight on approaches to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infections of the central nervous system (CNS) in travelers and immigrants.Recent FindingsUpdates on travel vaccine recommendations including vaccine-specific interactions with immunosuppressive agents, advances in Zika virus and dengue virus vaccine development, new diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis, updates on treatment approaches for tuberculosis meningitis.SummaryIncreasing rates of travel are leading to the spread of known infe...
Source: Current Infectious Disease Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Funding Opportunity ID: 292838 Opportunity Number: CDC-RFA-CK13-1301 Opportunity Title: Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Building Capacity and Networks to Address Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Americas (CK-1301-04SUPP2017)Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryOpportunity Category Explanation: Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: HealthCategory Explanation: CFDA Number(s): 93.099Eligible Applicants: Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Additional Information on Eligibility: Pan American Health Organization...
Source: Grants.gov - Category: Research Tags: Health Source Type: funding
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire It’s a fact of life: kids get hurt. We do everything we can to keep them safe, but shy of sticking them in bubbles, which would be a bad idea for all sorts of reasons, the reality is that injuries happen. Luckily, most injuries can be managed quite well at home. Here are some tips on how to do that — and how to know when you shouldn’t. Cuts and scrapes The vast majority of cuts and scrapes just need a good washing (plain old soap and water is fine — use a washcloth if there is any dirt or other debris) and a clean bandage. Change the bandage daily with a washing (takin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Injuries Pregnancy Safety Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The phenomenon that the newborn infant was healthy may be related to the protective role of placenta in resisting the invasion of the rabies virus or the absence of systemic viremia. The prompt administration of vaccines and anti-rabies immunoglobulin to the infant may have also contributed to his survival.
Source: Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
More News: Babies | Blogging | Girls | Internet | Parenting | Pregnancy | Rabies | Websites | Women