H1N1'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 -- Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 " swine flu " strain of influenza doesn't seem to have a link to birth defects. One obstetrician who reviewed the research said the findings should ease concerns...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

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It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
AbstractInfluenza A viruses evolve rapidly to escape host immunity. In swine, this viral evolution has resulted in the emergence of multiple H1 and H3 influenza A virus (IAV) lineages in the United States (US) pig populations. The heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy is a promising way to deal with diverse IAV infection in multiple animal models. However, whether or not this vaccination strategy is applicable to US swine to impart immunity against infection from North American strains of IAV is still unknown. We performed a vaccination-challenge study to evaluate the protective efficacy of using multivalent inacti...
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
TWiV reviews a new H1N1 swine influenza virus from China with pandemic potential, Ad5 vectored SARS-CoV-2 oral vaccine candidate, Operation Warp Speed vaccine candidates, FDA guidance on vaccine approval, and answer listener email. Click arrow to playDownload TWiV 634 (72 MB .mp3, 120 min)Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Show notes at microbe.tv/twiv
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: This Week in Virology adenovirus COVID-19 FDA vaccine guidance Operation Warp Speed SARS-CoV-2 viral viruses Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 19 May 2020Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Bao-Yang Ruan, Yun Yao, Shuai-Yong Wang, Xiao-Qian Gong, Xiao-Min Liu, Qi Wang, Ling-Xue Yu, Shi-Qiang Zhu, Juan Wang, Tong-Ling Shan, Yan-Jun Zhou, Wu Tong, Hao Zheng, Guo-Xin Li, Fei Gao, Ning Kong, Hai Yu, Guang-Zhi Tong
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Thomas A. FireyAmong the criticisms President Trump has received over his handling of COVID-19, one is that he ’s playing politics with disaster aid. TheDenver Post recently charged that he “is treating life‐​saving medical equipment as emoluments he can dole out as favors to loyalists.” Michigan Gov.Gretchen Whitmer has claimed that “vendors are being told not to send stuff here to Michigan.” Trump himself has said the governors “have to treat us well also” in order to get what they need.So far, evidence of actual favoritism is mixed. A Washington Post review of federal d...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
The World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11 declared COVID-19 a pandemic, pointing to the over 118,000 cases of the coronavirus illness in over 110 countries and territories around the world and the sustained risk of further global spread. “This is not just a public health crisis, it is a crisis that will touch every sector,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO director-general, at a media briefing. “So every sector and every individual must be involved in the fights.” An epidemic refers to an uptick in the spread of a disease within a specific community. By contrast, the WHO defines a pand...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
In conclusion, coadministration of CS NPs-poly(I:C) with CS NPs-KAg augmented the cross-reactive specific HI titers and the cell-mediated immune responses in pigs.
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Influenza A virus infection is a global health threat to livestock and humans, causing substantial mortality and morbidity. As both pigs and humans are readily infected with influenza viruses of similar subtype, the pig is a robust and appropriate model for investigating swine and human disease. We evaluated the efficacy of the human cold-adapted 2017–2018 quadrivalent seasonal LAIV in pigs against H1N1pdm09 challenge. LAIV immunized animals showed significantly reduced viral load in nasal swabs. There was limited replication of the H1N1 component of the vaccine in the nose, a limited response to H1N1 in the lung lym...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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