Neurosarcoidosis.

[Neurosarcoidosis]. Radiologe. 2016 Sep 15; Authors: Reith W, Roumia S, Popp C Abstract CLINICAL/METHODICAL ISSUE: Neurosarcoidosis is a relatively rare complication of sarcoidosis that occurs in approximately 5-15 % of patients. The clinical picture is variable. Clinically, neurosarcoidosis is mostly manifested as lesions of the cranial nerves (50-70 %) and several cranial nerves are typically affected. This is the result of aseptic granulomatous basal meningitis. Intraparenchymal granulomas also occur, frequently affecting basal near-midline structures, such as the hypothalamus and pituitary glands and can lead to encephalopathy. STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL METHODS: Diagnostics are essentially performed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as it can demonstrate the thickened meninges, which have a high affinity for contrast media but the results are not specific. Particularly in the absence of systemic sarcoidosis, diagnosis can be difficult. Laboratory tests are not very sensitive and specific, which makes neurosarcoidosis a diagnostic challenge. ACHIEVEMENTS: Due to the substantial morbidity of the disease, early and consistent treatment should be initiated. This is usually carried out with corticosteroids supported by immunosuppressant drugs, such as azathioprine and methotrexate. PMID: 27638827 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Radiologe - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Radiologe Source Type: research

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Authors: Tattevin P, Tchamgoué S, Belem A, Bénézit F, Pronier C, Revest M Abstract Aseptic meningitis is defined as meningeal inflammation - i.e. cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis≥5 cells/mm3 - not related to an infectious process. Etiologies of aseptic meningitis can be classified in three main groups: (i) systemic diseases with meningeal involvement, which include sarcoidosis, Behçet's disease, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and granulomatosis with polyangiitis; (ii) drug-induced aseptic meningitis, mostly reported with non-steroidal an...
Source: Revue Neurologique - Category: Neurology Tags: Rev Neurol (Paris) Source Type: research
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Conclusions: Pseudomeningoceles following ONSF may be asymptomatic or may cause symptomatic orbital mass effect and rarely visual loss, amendable to surgical excision. Post-ONSF pseudomeningoceles are identified on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to occur at the locations of fenestration sites and contain cerebrospinal fluid communicating with the subdural space that may act as a “filtration” bleb in some cases. Imaging findings may represent a spectrum spanning intraorbital cerebrospinal fluid leakage, partial walling off of bleb, or fully developed cysts. Resection of optic nerve pseudomen...
Source: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Original Investigations Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs
The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics, treatment, and outcome according to each etiology of pachymeningitis. We conducted a retrospective multicenter French nationwide study between 2000 and 2016 to describe the characteristics, outcome, and treatment of pachymeningitis. We included 60 patients (median age 55.5 years; interquartile range [IQR] 30–80, female/male ratio 0.43). Neurologic signs were present in 59 patients (98%) and consisted of headache in 43 (72%), cranial nerve palsy in 33 (55%), confusion in 10 (17%), seizures in 7 (12%), and focal neurologic signs in 9 (15%). Fever and weight ...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research
Chronic meningitis is a syndrome defined by the presence of clinical signs and symptoms of meningitis or meningoencephalitis with a persisting cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis that are present for at least 4 weeks. The differential diagnosis is broad, with categories including neoplastic, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, and noninfectious inflammatory disorders and central nervous system (CNS) infections. The exact frequency of the different etiologies often varies tremendously across reports; however, among most institutions, common infectious causes of chronic meningitis includeMycobacterium tuberculosis and fungal men...
Source: JAMA Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Recurrent facial palsy in a patient merits investigation for underlying etiology. CASE CHARACTERISTICS: 8-year-old boy with erythematous itchy skin lesion and recurrent facial palsy. OBSERVATION: He had a past history of aseptic meningitis and nephrocalcinosis. Raised angiotensin converting enzyme levels, interstitial lung disease on CT chest, and non caseating granulomas on skin biopsy clinched the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. MESSAGE: Multisystem involvement and recurrent lower motor facial nerve palsy is a clinical clue for sarcoidosis. PMID: 29726829 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Indian Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Indian Pediatr Source Type: research
Abstract Dust storms are strong winds which lead to particle exposure over extensive areas. These storms influence air quality on both a local and global scale which lead to both short and long-term effects. The frequency of dust storms has been on the rise during the last decade. Forecasts suggest that their incidence will increase as a response to the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities. Elderly people, young children, and individuals with chronic cardiopulmonary diseases are at the greatest risk for health effects of dust storms. A wide variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases have b...
Source: Environmental Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Res Source Type: research
A 48-year-old man with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS-associated cryptococcal meningitis was referred to our hospital with blurred vision in his left eye for several months. He was diagnosed with bilateral chronic posterior uveitis (Figure 1). After ruling out secondary uveitis, such as sarcoidosis, Beh çet disease, Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada disease, herpesvirus infection, and tuberculosis, uveitis was highly suspected to be attributable to syphilis, namely ocular syphilis, considering AIDS as his underlying disease and previous unprotected sexual contact with males and females.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Communication to the Editor Source Type: research
A 48-year-old man with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated cryptococcal meningitis was referred to our hospital with blurred vision in his left eye for several months. He was diagnosed with bilateral chronic posterior uveitis (Figure). After ruling out secondary uveitis, such as sarcoidosis, Beh çet disease, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, herpesvirus infection, and tuberculosis, uveitis was highly suspected to be attributable to syphilis, namely ocular syphilis, considering AIDS as his underlying disease and previous unprotected sexual con...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Communication to the Editor Source Type: research
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