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Toxic chemicals in household dust linked to cancer and infertility

Scientists find scores of harmful chemicals in indoor dust including phthalates linked to developmental problems in babiesHousehold dust harbours a cocktail of toxic chemicals that have been linked to an increased risk of a range of health hazards, from cancer to problems with fertility, researchers in the US have found.The chemicals are shed from a host of common products, from flooring to electrical goods as well as beauty and cleaning products.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Medical research Health Environment Hygiene Society Asthma Science & wellbeing Life and style Children UK news Source Type: news

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Huixiao Hong Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can mimic natural hormone to interact with receptors in the endocrine system and thus disrupt the functions of the endocrine system, raising concerns on the public health. In addition to disruption of the endocrine system, some EDCs have been found associated with many diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, infertility, asthma, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. EDCs that binding androgen receptor have been reported associated with diabetes mellitus in in vitro, animal, and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize the st...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Conclusions: These results demonstrate the possibility to predict large-scale mixture effects for endocrine disrupters with a predictive toxicology approach that is suitable for high-throughput ranking and risk assessment. The size of the effects predicted is consistent with an increased risk of infertility in women from everyday exposures to our chemical environment. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP742 Received: 30 June 2016 Revised: 07 December 2016 Accepted: 24 February 2017 Published: 19 July 2017 Address correspondence to F.Y. Bois, INERIS, DRC/VIVA, Parc ALATA, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, France. Telephone: 33-...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Researchers should still report back to participants who want to see their results, but they should disclose the risks of obtaining the information as part of the informed consent process. Citation: Goho SA. 2016. The legal implications of report back in household exposure studies. Environ Health Perspect 124:1662–1670; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP187 Address correspondence to S.A. Goho, Suite 4119, 6 Everett St., Cambridge, MA 02138 USA. Telephone: (617) 496-5692. E-mail: sgoho@law.harvard.edu This research derives from an idea developed by J. Brody and R. Rudel. P. Brown, J. Brody, R. Rudel, and W. ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Reviews November 2016 Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Western States Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; 2California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, California, USA; 3Collaborative on Health and the Environment, Bolinas, California, USA; 4Science and Environmental Health Network, Ames, Iowa, USA; 5Environmental Medicine Branch, Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, Georgia, USA PDF Version (3 MB) Summary About This Article Narrative approaches and storytelling are emerging a...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Brief Communication August 2016 Source Type: research
SPECIAL FROM You may watch what you eat, drink filtered water, and use your seat belt to protect yourself on the road. Yet many health hazards are lurking around us in not-so-obvious places. Here, a few to steer clear of:  1. Scented candles A fragrant candle may help you unwind and de-stress. But burning those containing a chemical calledlimonene, often used for citrus-scented candles, as well as many cleaning products, can produce fumes that are downright unhealthy. Recent British research found that households with a high levels of limonene correlated with high levels of formaldehyde, which irritates the eyes and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion A growing number of today’s children suffer from vaccine damage. Most individuals do not make the connection between health problems and vaccines. When asked about the cause of autoimmune disorders, asthma, allergies, diabetes, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, autism, and other common childhood diseases and illness, the majority of health care providers advise patients that the causes are unknown. Doctors, including most integrative physicians, fail to make the connection to vaccines. It takes one moment to permanently damage the health of an adult or child, but t...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories autoimmune disorders gardasil HPV Vaccine Medical Authority vaccine injury Source Type: blogs
Abstract Obesity is gaining acceptance as a serious primary health burden that impairs the quality of life because of its associated complications, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, asthma, sleep disorders, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and infertility. It is a complex metabolic disorder with a multifactorial origin. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role as the critical factor linking obesity with its associated complications. Obesity per se can induce systemic oxidative stress through various biochemical mechanisms, such as superoxide generation from NADPH oxida...
Source: Diabetes Metab - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Metab Syndr Relat Disord Source Type: research
Conclusion A. djalonensis and A. vogelii are potential antidiabetic and antibacterial agents. The antibacterial potency relates to infections or diseases caused by E. coli, S. typhi and S. aureus such as urinary tract infections, typhoid, diarrhea, skin diseases, and food poisoning. Pharmacological research on this genus is quite elementary and limited, thus, more advanced research is necessary to isolate and determine the activities of bioactive compounds in vitro and in vivo, establish their mechanisms of action and commence the process of clinical research. Graphical abstract
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
When I started practicing medicine, I made a discovery that changed my view of the world forever. It was something few understood at the time. I’m talking about an “alien molecule” that gets into your blood and reprograms your cells to become more “feminine.” When this happens to women, it throws off their natural cycles, makes them gain weight, and pushes them emotionally into a very anxious and frustrated state. For men, this “invader” makes them soft, fat, depressed, and unable to perform. When I first started testing for this back in the 1990s, other physicians thought I was of...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Air BPA breathing lungs toxins Source Type: news
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