Blame It On The Boys: How To Stop Vampire Bats From Spreading Rabies

Poisoning these thirsty critters doesn't work. But researchers think they're finally getting close to figuring out a plan.
Source: NPR Health and Science - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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This study aimed to evaluate timeliness and da ta quality of national outbreak reporting for four countries in the Mekong Basin Disease Surveillance network (MBDS). Data on disease outbreaks occurring from 2010 to 2015 were obtained from the national disease surveillance reports of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, and Vietnam. Data included total cas es, geographical information, and dates at different timeline milestones in the outbreak detection process. Nine diseases or syndromes with public health importance were selected for the analysis including: dengue, food poisoning&diarrhea, severe diarrhea, diphtheria, measles, ...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blogWelcome to the 309th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the WeekCliff Reid challenges us to review The Physician’s Pledge and ask ourselves where ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. CHERANGAN, KENYA ― Walking home from a party in the evening light, Cheposait Adomo was unaware of the 6.5-foot black mamba snake in her path until it had coiled around her ankles and sunk in its teeth. As Adomo screamed and pulled at the slithering knot that punctured her three times, she was unaware of the two other brown-colored mambas slithering over to provide backup. “I felt the bites and then a burning sensation,” Adomo, a mother of five, said of the attack, wh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Doctors often assure parents that vaccines are safe, using phrases like “one in a million” and “rare” to describe adverse reactions. Yet, with sad stories like RD’s, thousands of adverse events reported to VAERS, and the creation of a special court for vaccine injuries, informed parents know those vaccine safety claims are simply not true. If you have not already done so, please consider the overall safety of vaccinations. A federal program has awarded billions of dollars, through an arduous, emotionally painful process, to people whose family members have suffered injury or death a...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Case Reports on Vaccine Injury Human Missy Fluegge Patricia Finn transverse myelitis truth about vaccines United States Court of Federal Claims Vaccine Court VAERS Varicella vaccine Source Type: blogs
Rats spread disease, decimate crops and very occasionally eat people alive. For centuries, we have struggled to find an effective way of controlling their numbers. Until now …First, the myths. There are no “super rats”. Apart from a specific subtropical breed, they do not get much bigger than 20 inches long, including the tail. They are not blind, nor are they afraid of cats. They do not carry rabies. They do not, as was reported in 1969 regarding an island in Indonesia, fall from the sky. Their c ommunities are not led by elusive, giant “king rats”. Rat skeletons cannot liquefy and reconstit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science Health Environment Source Type: news
El objetivo de estudio fue conocer las percepciones sobre la vacunación contra la rabia silvestre en comunidades nativas de la etnia Awajún, en Amazonas, Perú, 2012. Realizamos un estudio cualitativo a través de entrevistas de baja estructuración, para recoger las percepciones de la población, autoridades locales y personal de salud. Las percepciones sobre las causas de la RS fueron atribuidas a murciélagos portadores de alguna infección, veneno y daño sobrenatural, o al efecto de brujería. Manifestaron el efecto mortal de la RS e información vari...
Source: Physis: Revista de Saude Coletiva - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
As spring approaches, you may be thinking about this year’s summer getaway. Or maybe you’re an Type A planner who is already booking a Thanksgiving or Christmas trip. Whatever your travel style, here's something you probably haven't considered: How to stay healthy while abroad. While you probably won’t make a Pinterest board of vaccinations with the same enthusiasm as you pin must-eat pastries and stylish travel outfits, taking care of your health on a trip might just save your life. Here are seven tips to help keep your vacations as stress- and sickness-free as possible:  1. First, call your doctor....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 119 Question 1 Which surgeon had a mortality rate of 300% during a single operation? How did this happen? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet109074172'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink109074172')) Robert Liston (1794-1847) Liston operated in a time before anaesthesia. It was recognised that a speedy operation could significantly improve the outcomes for a patient, and Mr Liston ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Frivolous Friday Five capecitabine ciguatera FFFF louis pasteur Oncology rabies robert liston virchow Source Type: blogs
Images of scientists inserting eye-of-newt genes into escarole, or wool-of-bat genes into watercress stalk the nightmares of pure food proponents, and up to a point-- rightly so. Even if the intentions of those tinkering with foods are good- such as putting antifreeze genes from amphibians into oranges so they are not destroyed by an early frost- the law of unintended consequences pertains. There is ample reason, in principle, to be wary of Frankenfoods. There may be reason in epidemiology as well. We are substantially uncertain about why rates of gluten intolerance and celiac disease are rising; genetic modification of f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Concepts and discoveries of a leading disease Myasthenia gravis have often been based on chance finding and unfairness. Study Supported by: NONEDisclosure: Dr. Bandyopadhyay has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: History of Neurology Source Type: research
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