Researchers Find Molecular Link Behind Aspirin’s Protective Powers

Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016Aspirin ’s ability to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular disease and colon cancer has been a welcome, yet puzzling, attribute of the pain reliever that has been a mainstay in medicine cabinets for more than 100 years. Now researchers atDuke Health have identified a new mechanism of aspirin ’s action that appears to explain the drug’s diverse benefits. Publishing in the journal EBioMedicine, the researchers describe how aspirin directly impacts the function of a gene regulatory protein that not only influences the function of platelets, but also suppresses tumors in the colon.“This research identifies a new way in which aspirin works that was not predicted based on the known pharmacology,” said lead authorDeepak Voora, M.D., assistant professor in Duke ’sCenter for Applied Genomics&Precision Medicine. Voora said aspirin ’s pain-reducing and blood thinning powers have long been traced to its ability to block COX-1, an enzyme involved in both inflammation and blood clotting.“But COX-1 has only partially explained how aspirin works for cardiovascular health,” he said, “and it has not been shown to be implicated in cancer at all.”Instead, Voora and colleagues focused on a pattern of gene activity they call an aspirin response signature the team had previously...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news
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As The Author of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories, I'm honored to be chosen to be part AlzAuthors. This post is courtesy of AlzAuthors. Read through for some incredible deals on ebooks written by authors who've been where you are. MOE is among the books on sale. All are $2.99 or less. November is National Caregiver Appreciation Month, a time to recognize the long hours, sacrifice, and love all caregivers bring to the task of caring for a loved one with dementia or any long-term illness. In honor of their efforts, AlzAuthors is hosting an eBook sale and giveaway! This is a terrific way f...
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In this study, we focused on two pathways of cardiomyocytes or heart cells: the Hippo pathway, which is involved in stopping renewal of adult cardiomyocytes, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) pathway, essential for cardiomyocyte normal functions." Previous work had hinted that components of the DGC pathway may somehow interact with members of the Hippo pathway. The researchers genetically engineered mice to lack genes involved in one or both pathways, and then determined the ability of the heart to repair an injury. These studies showed for the first time that dystroglycan 1, a component of the DGC ...
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized AHCA health reform MICHEL ACCAD repeal and replace Source Type: blogs
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Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Chronic Conditions Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Turk Kardiyoloji Dernegi arsivi - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars Source Type: research
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