Outlook & Research into Alzheimer ’ s

Developing new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease is an active area of research. Scientists are testing a number of drugs to see if they prevent Alzheimer’s disease, slow the disease, or help reduce behavioral symptoms. There is evidence that inflammation in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and that drugs to cut down on inflammation may help. One recent study showed that two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs — rofecoxib and naproxen — did not slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in people already diagnosed. Scientists believe, however, that anti-inflammatory drugs may still prove effective in preventing Alzheimer’s disease in people who are at risk, but who do not yet have symptoms of Alzheimer’s. A clinical prevention trial is now under way. A clinical trial is a research study on people to find out whether a new drug or treatment is both safe and effective. Research has shown that vitamin E slows the progress of some consequences of Alzheimer’s disease by about 7 months. Scientists now are studying vitamin E to learn whether it can prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment, or MCI. Medicines already used to help reduce the risk of heart disease may help lower the chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease or may slow its progression. Clinical trials of drugs known as statins have begun to see if they might help slow down the progression of Alzheim...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Memory and Perception Alzheimer's disease anti-inflammatory drugs drug testing Ginkgo biloba mental decline new treatment vitamin E Source Type: news

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In conclusion, the recently demonstrated protective effects of NMN treatment on neurovascular function can be attributed to multifaceted sirtuin-mediated anti-aging changes in the neurovascular transcriptome. Our present findings taken together with the results of recent studies using mitochondria-targeted interventions suggest that mitochondrial rejuvenation is a critical mechanism to restore neurovascular health and improve cerebral blood flow in aging. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling as a Point of Intervention to Spur Greater Neural Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/wnt-%ce%b2-catenin-sig...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study was aimed to estimate variations of measures of cardiovascular risk in Alzheimer's dementia by pharmacogenetic analyses of the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statins. Methods: Consecutive patients were prospectively followed to study variations of creatinine clearance and blood pressure for one year, estimated by correlating the effects of ACE inhibitors with the ACE Alu I/D polymorphism and genotypes or haplotypes of rs1800764 or rs4291, and the effects of statins with LDLR (low-density lipoprotein receptor) genotypes or haplotypes of rs11669576 (exon 8) or rs5930 (exon 10), ...
Source: Indian J Med Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Indian J Med Res Source Type: research
In this study we show, for the first time, significant alterations in cholesterol efflux capacity in adolescents throughout the range of BMI, a relationship between six circulating adipocyte-derived EVs microRNAs targeting ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux capacity, and in vitro alterations of cholesterol efflux in macrophages exposed to visceral adipose tissue adipocyte-derived EVs acquired from human subjects. These results suggest that adipocyte-derived EVs, and their microRNA content, may play a critical role in the early pathological development of ASCVD. Commentary on the Developing UK Government Position on Hea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
There are a number of things that can increase the risk of dementia: age, of course, as well as certain genetic profiles and behaviors such as smoking and drinking. Some of the same things that contribute to heart disease, such as high cholesterol levels and the build up of plaques in the blood vessels, can also boost the chances of developing dementia. And in a large study published in JAMA Internal Medicine conducted in the UK, researchers report another possible factor: a group of drugs known as anticholinergics. These include prescription medications for treating depression, pulmonary disease, and Parkinson’s, as...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain Dementia Drugs Source Type: news
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
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