Multiple Cerebral Infarctions in a Patient with Adenomyosis on Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Case Report

A 59-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of repeated episodes of bilateral hand weakness. She had a 10-year history of combined estrogen –progestin therapy for menopausal symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging on admission showed multiple hyperintense lesions in bilateral cerebral and cerebellar cortices on diffusion-weighted imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography showed thrombus formation on the aortic valve and moderate aortic i nsufficiency. Laboratory test demonstrated elevated CA125 (334.8 U/mL) and D-dimer (7.0 µg/mL) levels.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Case Studies Source Type: research

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Conclusions: In postmenopausal Taiwanese women, HT may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Although the women in our population receiving HT were near menopausal age, their risk of cardiovascular disease was still higher than in the non-HT group.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Semin Neurol 2018; 38: 627-633 DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1673681Headache is a neurologic disorder that displays gender dichotomy. It is well established that there is a strong link between migraine headache and sex hormones, specifically estrogen, which influences the severity of migraines during the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause. Furthermore, the epidemiology of headaches during pregnancy and the postpartum period is very distinct from that in males or nonpregnant females, in part due to the hemodynamic and hematologic changes that occur during pregnancy. These changes put women at higher risk for cerebral venous th...
Source: Seminars in Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
The 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) updates the 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society and identifies future research needs. An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health and menopause was recruited by NAMS to review the 2012 Position Statement, evaluate new literature, assess the evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations, using the level of evidence to identify the strength of recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and approved by...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Commemorative Papers Source Type: research
Menopause is an important transition in the life of women. It has been estimated that by the year 2030, worldwide 1.2 billion women will be menopausal. The most bothersome symptoms of menopause are believed to be due to declines in estrogen levels in postmenopausal women. Thus, hormone therapy is an effective treatment option for menopausal women, although prolonged use of hormone therapy is associated with a slightly increased risk of breast cancer, thromboembolism, and stroke. A literature search for studies evaluating the effects of hormone therapy in menopausal women with asymptomatic fibroids demonstrated variable eff...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Personal Perspective Source Type: research
Authors: Lello S, Capozzi A, Scambia G Abstract The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC) pairs conjugated estrogens (CE) with a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), bazedoxifene acetate (BZA). A 2-year treatment with the TSEC improved vasomotor symptoms, quality of life, and vaginal atrophy in healthy postmenopausal women. In addition, the TSEC prevented vertebral and hip bone loss without increasing mammographic density, breast tenderness, the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or venous thromboembolism. Finally, the BZA 20 mg/CE 0.45 mg dose did not increase the risk of endometrial ...
Source: International Journal of Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Int J Endocrinol Source Type: research
Conclusions:The risks of cardiovascular disease and cancer were not elevated among postmenopausal women using vaginal estrogens, providing reassurance about the safety of treatment. Objective: To determine the association between use of vaginal estrogen and risk of a global index event (GIE), defined as time to first occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD), invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, hip fracture, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, or death from any cause. Methods: For this prospective observational cohort study, we used data from participants of the Women's Health Initiative Observat...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
This study, the first to examine potential adverse health effects in users of vaginal estrogen compared with non-users, suggests that vaginal estrogen therapy is a safe treatment for genitourinary symptoms such as burning, discomfort, and pain during intercourse associated with menopause.AUTHORSThe paper ’s authors are Dr. Carolyn Crandall of UCLA; Kathleen Hovey of the State University of New York at Buffalo; Christopher Andrews of the University of Michigan; Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of City of Hope; Marcia Stefanick of Stanford University; Dr. Dorothy Lane of the State University of New York at Ston y Brook; Dr. Jan Sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Abstract: The 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) updates the 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society and identifies future research needs. An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health and menopause was recruited by NAMS to review the 2012 Position Statement, evaluate new literature, assess the evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations, using the level of evidence to identify the strength of recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and a...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Position Statement Source Type: research
Authors: Parish SJ, Gillespie JA Abstract This review describes the evolving role of oral hormone therapy (HT) for treating menopausal symptoms and preventing osteoporosis, focusing on conjugated estrogens/bazedoxifene (CE/BZA). Estrogens alleviate hot flushes and prevent bone loss associated with menopause. In nonhysterectomized women, a progestin should be added to estrogens to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. Use of HT declined since the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) studies showed that HT does not prevent coronary heart disease (CHD) and that conjugated estrogens/medroxyprogesterone acetate increased th...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
Conclusions: In black postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy, estrogen alone significantly reduced breast cancer incidence with no adverse influence on CHD, venous thromboembolism, or all-cause mortality. Favorable estrogen-alone global index effects in younger black women warrant further study.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
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