Formal Thought Disorder in First-Episode Psychosis

Formal thought disorder (FTD) is one of the fundamental symptom clusters of schizophrenia and it was found to be the strongest predictor determining conversion from first-episode acute transient psychotic disorder to schizophrenia. Our goal in the present study was to compare a first-episode psychosis (FEP) sample to a healthy control group in relation to subtypes of FTD.Fifty six patients aged between 15 and 45 with FEP and forty five control subjects were included in the study. All the patients were under medication for less than six weeks or drug-naive.
Source: Comprehensive Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research

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The aims of the present study were to 1) evaluate clinical differences between patients suffering from schizophrenia (SZ) with mild versus moderate/severe formal thought disorder (FTD); 2) explore relationships between dimensions of FTD, neuropsychological domains, and global functioning; and 3) compare clinical dimensions of FTD in early and late SZ. One hundred thirty-six individuals with schizophrenia were recruited and evaluated during a nonacute phase of illness. FTD was assessed with the Thought, Language, and Communication Scale. Partial correlations, t-tests, and stepwise regression were undertaken to address the s...
Source: The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are considered as hallmark symptoms of psychosis, more specifically of schizophrenia. A substantial body of evidence indicates that AVHs can be attributed to a disorganization of overall speech capacity in psychotic subjects. AVHs are associated with activation of cortical areas of the brain that are related to speech production and perception; “voices” in deaf patients seem to be about the message rather than the sound of it; the content of AVHs is often related to that of delusional ideas; the internal or external location of AVHs makes little diagnostic difference; AVHs ...
Source: The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research
The debilitating nature of psychosis may be exacerbated by societal stigma and feelings of social isolation over and above positive (e.g., hallucinations) and negative (e.g., flat affect) symptoms. Thus, recovery may be facilitated by increasing self-compassion, the ability to respond with a nonjudgmental attitude of kindness toward oneself as a result of connecting with one's own inadequacies and suffering. We conducted a stepwise regression in individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (n = 92) to determine the unique contributions of cognitive variables in predicting self-compassion, such as metacognition (the ab...
Source: The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Publication date: 12 December 2019Source: Cell, Volume 179, Issue 7Author(s): Cross-Disorder Group of the Psychiatric Genomics ConsortiumSummaryGenetic influences on psychiatric disorders transcend diagnostic boundaries, suggesting substantial pleiotropy of contributing loci. However, the nature and mechanisms of these pleiotropic effects remain unclear. We performed analyses of 232,964 cases and 494,162 controls from genome-wide studies of anorexia nervosa, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and Tourette synd...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
We report a case from Nepal where psychogenic polydipsia was complicated to hyponatremia and lead to seizure episodes. We emphasize on asking a routine question about polydipsia in every patient of Schizophrenia in clinics. PMID: 31827965 [PubMed]
Source: Case Reports in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Case Rep Psychiatry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 December 2019Source: Schizophrenia Research: CognitionAuthor(s): Hanna Kucwaj, Adam ChuderskiAbstractProportional analogies between four objects (e.g., a squirrel is to tree as a golden fish is to? aquarium) were examined in 30 schizophrenia patients and 30 healthy controls. Half of the problems included distracting response options: remote semantic associates (fishing rod) and perceptually similar salient distractors (shark). Although both patients and controls performed fairly accurately on the no-distraction analogies, patients’ performance in the presence of distractors was d...
Source: Schizophrenia Research: Cognition - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study was designed to evaluate the long ‐term safety and effectiveness of lurasidone in the treatment of schizophrenia among Asian patients.MethodsPatients (N = 281) with schizophrenia who had completed a randomized, double ‐blind (DB), 6‐week comparison of lurasidone (40 and 80 mg/day) and placebo were enrolled in a 26‐week extension study in which all patients received open‐label (OL), flexible doses of lurasidone (40 or 80 mg/day). Effectiveness was measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PA NSS) scale.ResultsFifty ‐seven percent of patients completed the OL extension study; 16.7% disco...
Source: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Genetic risk is thought to drive clinical variation on a spectrum of schizophrenia-like traits but the underlying changes in brain structure that mechanistically link genomic variation to schizotypal experience and behaviour are unclear.
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research
In a 20-year study, most cognitive functions in 445 individuals with psychotic disorders declined, according to a report published inJAMA Psychiatry.“Compared with a matched control group, year-20 cognitive outcomes were poor in [participants with] psychotic disorders, especially for older participants,” wrote Anne-Kathrin J. Fett, Ph.D., of the University of London and colleagues. “These results provide the first comprehensive picture of long-term cognitive changes and associated clinical and functional outcomes in psychotic disorders.”The participants were part of the Suffolk County Mental Health ...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Anne-Kathrin J. Fett cognitive decline Ph.D. psychotic disorders Suffolk County Mental Health Project Source Type: research
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