Soy may help protect women with PCOS from diabetes, heart disease

(The Endocrine Society) Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome -- a common cause of female infertility -- may be able to improve their metabolic and cardiovascular health by consuming soy isoflavones, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology&Metabolism.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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Regulation of transforming growth factor β-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lens epithelial cells by c-Src kinase under high glucose conditions. Exp Ther Med. 2018 Aug;16(2):1520-1528 Authors: Han ZH, Wang F, Wang FL, Liu Q, Zhou J Abstract Recent studies have reported that high glucose (HG) conditions may contribute to the acceleration of renal cell apoptosis and renal fibrosis by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tubular epithelial cells, in which c-Src kinase and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β are key modulators. In the present study, the roles of c-Src k...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
Authors: Al-Kafaji G, Aljadaan A, Kamal A, Bakhiet M Abstract The mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA-CN) is a surrogate measure of mitochondrial function and altered mtDNA-CN reflects the oxidant-induced cell damage. A previous study by our group demonstrated that a reduction in the renal mtDNA-CN is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), a leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetic patients. In the present study, it was investigated whether the mtDNA-CN in the peripheral blood may be utilized as a biomarker for DN in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. The study included 50 non-diabet...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that SIRT5 may serve an important role in the pathogenesis of T2D, and may present a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with T2D. PMID: 30116390 [PubMed]
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
In conclusion, these results indicate that decreased FGF-21 levels are associated with the risk of GDM, suggesting that FGF-21 may be a potential diagnostic factor for GDM. PMID: 30116389 [PubMed]
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in adult women (1). It can't be cured, but thanks to many years of fruitful research and intensive investigation, multiple modalities to help manage the condition throughout a woman's lifetime have emerged. Those of us who have been in practice for more than a decade or two have likely had the experience of managing mothers and daughters with the condition. Many of us have supported our PCOS patients through an adolescence complicated by acne and hair growth, an early adulthood complicated by infertility and irregular menses, and late reproductive age compl...
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
(University of California - San Diego) Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common hormone condition that contributes to infertility and metabolic problems, such as diabetes and heart disease, tend to have less diverse gut bacteria than women who do not have the condition, according to researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues at Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poland and San Diego State University.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a highly inheritable complex genetic trait and one of the most prevalent endocrine-metabolic-reproductive disorders of humans, clinically evident in 10% –15% of reproductive-age women. It is the single most common cause of ovulatory infertility in women and of subfertility overall in Western societies. Fundamentally, most patients with PCOS, particularly those with hyperandrogenic phenotypes, also demonstrate underlying metabolic dysfunction and s ubclinical chronic inflammation, leading to insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Authors: Liu K, Motan T, Claman P Abstract OBJECTIVES: To review the etiology, evaluation, and treatment of hirsutism. EVALUATION: A thorough history and physical examination plus selected laboratory evaluations will confirm the diagnosis and direct treatment. TREATMENT: Pharmacologic interventions can suppress ovarian or adrenal androgen production and block androgen receptors in the hair follicle. Hair removal methods and lifestyle modifications may improve or hasten the therapeutic response. OUTCOMES: At least 6 to 9 months of therapy are required to produce improvement in hirsutism. EVIDENCE: Th...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
DiscussionPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 6-8% of reproductive-age women making it the most common endocrinopathy in this age group. There is no consensus on the specific diagnostic criteria for PCOS in adolescents as many of the characteristics overlap with normal adolescent physiology. However, patients should have evidence of hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhea, and potentially polycystic ovaries. PCOS has a genetic component although a specific gene has not been identified. Incidence of PCOS is 20-40% for a woman with a family history. Hyperandrogenism Androgen levels change during puberty therefore actual ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
I remember in my early training that the first question to ask a patient with polycystic ovary syndrome was: "Are you trying to get pregnant?" If no, hand them the birth control pill. If yes, choose between clomid, a fertility drug, and metformin, an insulin sensitizer. No questions related to lifestyle, stress, nutrition, total toxic burden – there were 29 more patients to get to that day. It turns out, many lifestyle changes have been shown to pull someone out of the metabolic chaos of PCOS, therefore decreasing their chances of developing comorbidities such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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