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What ’s the best way to quit smoking?

Smoking cigarettes contributes to almost 1 in 5 deaths. The top three smoking-related causes of death are cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition to these “top three,” smoking is also linked to a number of other cancers, an increased likelihood of getting more colds and infections, diabetes, osteoporosis and hip fractures, problems in pregnancy, difficulty with erections, stomach ulcers, gum disease, and the list goes on. Quitting smoking can add years to your life. Though the earlier the better, it’s never too late to quit. The benefits of quitting are real, even at the age of 80! So what’s the best way to quit? Set a quit date Pick a date in the next few weeks, share it with your friends and your family, and mark it on your calendar. Plan to completely stop smoking on that quit date. Think about what might make it challenging to stop. Be prepared for how you will handle any withdrawal symptoms. Identify what triggers your craving for a cigarette, and have a strategy to avoid or deal with these triggers. Start exercising before your quit date to minimize weight gain when you stop smoking. Find healthy distractions to keep your mind and hands busy. Have nicotine replacement products like nicotine gum and patches ready on hand if you plan to use them. Going “cold turkey” might be better You can choose to cut down on your cigarettes gradually before your quit date, or smoke as you nor...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: Among ischemic stroke patients, higher omentin-1 levels were inversely associated with carotid plaque instability, but not associated with moderate-severe carotid stenosis or occlusion. Omentin-1 may represent a biomarker for predicting carotid plaque instability of acute ischemic stroke patients. PMID: 29225325 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis - Category: Cardiology Tags: J Atheroscler Thromb Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with dapagliflozin for six months significantly improved glycemic control and reduced body weight without reducing muscle mass in T2DM patients. PMID: 29225209 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis - Category: Cardiology Tags: J Atheroscler Thromb Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
We highly appreciate the response from de Miguel-Yanes et  al1 about the influence of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the incidence rate of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). Because patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) are at high risk for the development of DM, it is an important issue with significant implications for clinical practice.2
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
In their recent observational study, Zhao et  al1 found similar incidence rates of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) versus other biliary diseases, and they reported lower PEP incidence rates as the severity of CP increased. The authors state that they “identified other possible risk and protective fact ors not examined before. The reduced incidence of PEP in CP patients was correlated with the presence of diabetes mellitus, pancreatic stones, and the use of ESWL (extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy).” We would like to point out that our group had formerly evalu...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
A relationship between endoscopists ’ adenoma detection rate (ADR) at colonoscopy and risk of interval colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer death has been proven.1-3 Since then, ADR became one of the most important performance indicators for colonoscopy, endorsed by several professional societies.4,5 Although ADR depends on adeno ma prevalence in the target population,6-8 it is endoscopist performance that best explains observed ADR variability among physicians.9 Four key factors are believed to drive endoscopists’ performance in detecting adenomas: knowledge, imaging technology, colonoscopy examination tech...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide,1 and most cases are locally advanced or metastatic at diagnosis. Widespread Helicobacter pylori eradication2 and radiologic or endoscopic screening,3 have been proved to decrease gastric cancer mortality in high-incidence countries. However, in countries with lower incidence, these strategies are probably not cost effective, and there are only recommendations regarding secondary prevention in high-risk patients, such as those with gastric preneoplastic conditions.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Despite guidelines1 that recommend a 10-year interval after a negative screening colonoscopy result in average-risk individuals, many patients receive early examinations.2,3 This could be due to concerns about the adequacy of the baseline examination or to a fear of postcolonoscopy interval colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior studies suggest that if the baseline examination was less than adequate (poor preparation or uncertain cecal intubation), the yield of repeating the examination is high.4 However, in most cases, the baseline examination is adequate, and previous work has suggested that the risk of serious pathologic change...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
According to a study published inKidney International, kidney disease may increase the risk of diabetes.Medical Xpress
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
A study published in theNew England Journal of Medicine reports that the sustained use of birth control pills is associated with a small but significant risk of breast cancer.News Medical
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
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