Is Mental Health ready to start transitioning towards measurable brain circuits, away from subjective symptoms?

To Diagnose Mental Illness, Read the Brain (Scientific American): Although scientists have learned a lot about the brain in the last few decades, approaches to treating mental illnesses have not kept up. As neuroscientists learn more about brain circuits, Stanford psychiatrist Amit Etkin foresees a time when diagnoses will be based on brain scans rather than symptoms…(Etkin says that) We understand behavior is essentially underpinned by brain circuits. That is, there are circuits in the brain that determine certain types of behaviors and certain types of thoughts and feelings. That’s probably the most useful way of organizing brain function. If you can start characterizing circuit disruptions for compensatory symptoms at an individual subject level and then link that to how you can provide interventions, then you can get away completely from diagnoses and can intervene with brain function in a directed way. Related article: Mental Illness – One Treatment to Cure Them All, One Network to Bind Them? (BrainBlogger): Imagine: A cure all for ALL mental illnesses… sounds illogical, perhaps impossible, something straight out of fantasy, no? Well, at the SharpBrains Virtual Summit, Monitoring &Enhancing Brain Health in the Pervasive Neuroscience Era, where presenting cutting-edge innovative research was the norm, I was lucky to be witness to a truly tantalizing talk by psychologist Dr. Madeleine Goodkind that will likely change your perspective.&nbs...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness brain brain circuits brain deficits brain-function brain-scans Mental-Health mental-illness mind psychiatrist psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Alcohol is a dangerous substance. It is addictive, can deteriorate one’s health, and puts innocent people in danger. However, it is embraced and celebrated in society and there are many opportunities throughout life to try alcohol. Knowing that alcohol is dangerous and addictive can leave many people wondering, “why do people drink alcohol?” Soothe an Underlying Mental Health Condition One of the major reasons that individuals who suffer from alcohol use disorder drink are because they are suffering from an underlying mental health condition and are using alcohol to self-medicate. This condition can be e...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 22 August 2019Source: The Lancet PsychiatryAuthor(s): Meng-Chuan Lai, Caroline Kassee, Richard Besney, Sarah Bonato, Laura Hull, William Mandy, Peter Szatmari, Stephanie H AmeisSummaryBackgroundCo-occurring mental health or psychiatric conditions are common in autism, impairing quality of life. Reported prevalences of co-occurring mental health or psychiatric conditions in people with autism range widely. Improved prevalence estimates and identification of moderators are needed to enhance recognition and care, and to guide future research.MethodsIn this systematic review and meta-analysis...
Source: The Lancet Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
__________ Psychiatric diagnosis ‘scientifically meaningless’ (Science Daily): “A new study, published in Psychiatry Research, has concluded that psychiatric diagnoses are scientifically worthless as tools to identify discrete mental health disorders. The study, led by researchers from the University of Liverpool, involved a detailed analysis of five key chapters of the latest edition of the widely used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), on ‘schizophrenia’, ‘bipolar disorder’, ‘depressive disorders’, ‘anxiety disorders’ and ‘trauma-related disord...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness anxiety-disorders bipolar-disorder depressive disorders diagnostic labelling digital biomarkers DSM DSM-5 mental health mental health disorders psychiatric diagnosis psychiatry research sc Source Type: blogs
What Are 5 Underlying Reasons for Addiction? Addiction always stems from a root cause, also known as one of the reasons for addiction. It is extremely important to treat both the root cause of the addiction in addition to the physical addiction itself. Staying sober involves much more than just detoxing from drugs or alcohol and abstaining from them in the future. It also involves finding the underlying reasons for the addiction and treating that as well, so that it does not exacerbate the addiction in the future. This is why so many people fail when they attempt to quit using drugs or alcohol cold turkey. While there can ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Abuse Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcohol Alcoholism Anxiety Children Depression Depression Treatment Drug Treatment LGBT LGBTQ Mental Health Painkiller Source Type: blogs
Authors: Konstantakopoulos G Abstract There is now general agreement that lack of insight is not merely a fundamental aspect of delusions and hallucinations, or just a symptom of psychotic disorders but rather a multi-dimensional construct. Several different components of insight have been proposed and empirically examined during the last three decades, such as the ability to recognize that one has a mental illness, the capacity to relabel unusual mental events as pathological, the specific attribution of one's symptoms to having a mental illness, awareness of illness' consequences, and compliance with treatment.1 ...
Source: Psychiatriki - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatriki Source Type: research
Conclusion It is clear that clinically, there is still much to be learnt about alexithymia and its relationship with a range of related phenomena. Firstly, is alexithymia a continuous and stable trait independent of psychological or somatic symptomology that is developed during childhood? Or is it instead a reactive state induced by trauma and distress at any age, which serves to defend against intense and upsetting emotions? This impacts on treatment options. For example, should we be focussing on early childhood interventions which target the child's emotional environment and parenting to encourage emotional exp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Does Marijuana Use Cause Schizophrenia? (The New York Times): “… The concern is focused largely on the link between heavy usage and psychosis in young people. Doctors first suspected a link some 70 years ago, and the evidence has only accumulated since then. In a forthcoming book, “Tell Your Children,” Alex Berenson, a former Times reporter, argues that legalization is putting a generation at higher risk of schizophrenia and other psychotic syndromes. Critics, including leading researchers, have called the argument overblown, and unfaithful to the science… The debate centers on the di...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness cannabis drugs marijuana psychosis schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
In this study, we investigated the effects of two novel smartphone interventions on cognitive flexibility and OCD symptoms in healthy individuals with OCD-like contamination fears. In the first intervention, participants watched a brief video recording of themselves engaging in handwashing on a smartphone, four times a day, for a total of one week (N=?31). The second intervention was similar except that participants watched themselves repeatedly touching a disgust-inducing object (N=?31). In a third (control) “intervention”, participants watched themselves performing sequential hand movements (N=?31). As hypoth...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Technology app Brain-Training brain-training-app cognitive-flexibility handwashing obsessive-compulsive disorder OCD smartphone Source Type: blogs
What is a Co-Occuring disorder? The coexistence of both a mental health disorder and a substance abuse use disorder is referred to as a co-occurring disorder. Any combination of mental health and addiction can be referred to as having a co-occuring disorder. The combinations can be seemingly endless, and can even include more than one of either a mental disorder or an addiction. Combinations may include depression and alcoholism, anorexia and cocaine addiction, bipolar disorder and heroin addiction and the list goes on. Surprisingly, as many as 6 in 10 substance abusers also have at least one other mental disorder. There i...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources ADHD Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Anxiety Behavioral Addictions Depression Depression Treatment Drinking Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eat Source Type: blogs
Conclusion offered by NHS Choices) This study showed some promising initial findings for a new way of managing auditory hallucinations in people with schizophrenia. It may be possible for people to be able to learn how to better control and cope with the sounds they hear by using a process of computer feedback. But this was only a pilot study and wasn’t designed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. To do this would require: A much larger number of participants to see whether the effects could be consistently detected and not down to chance. A control group. It may be helpful to compare the results w...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology auditory auditory hallucinations Brain-Training fMRI fMRI neurofeedback literacy neurocognitive neuroimaging NHS NHS Choices schizophrenia video-game Source Type: blogs
More News: Addiction | Anxiety | Bipolar | Brain | Depression | Health | Health Management | Learning | Mania | Men | Neurologists | Neurology | Neuroscience | Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | PET Scan | Psychiatry | Psychology | Schizophrenia | Universities & Medical Training