1 in 8 advanced prostate cancers may be linked to faulty genes

Conclusion Much of modern cancer treatment is aimed at finding the right treatment for the right person, and this type of genetic research may help doctors to target treatments at the people who are most likely to benefit from them. It's not news that mutations in DNA repair genes like BRCA2 are linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer, although we are still some way from understanding how that link works. But the finding that these mutations seem to be much more common in men whose cancer has spread around the body is interesting. Doctors have long wanted a test that could identify which prostate cancers are more likely to spread, and this genetic test could potentially add to the information that helps pinpoint that risk. A class of medication known as poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors has proved useful in treating other types of cancer associated with mutations in DNA repair genes. Further research to explore this avenue of potential treatment would be useful. The study has important limitations. Different methods of DNA analysis were used in different hospitals, which might have affected the results. More importantly, there was no direct comparison group, so researchers were unable to balance or match men with metastatic cancer with men with localised prostate cancer of the same age or with the same family history, to get an unbiased comparison between the two groups. The study used to compare rates of gene mutations in men with localis...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 July 2018Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Reviews on CancerAuthor(s): Niamh Mc Namee, Lorraine O'DriscollAbstractExtracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes, microvesicles, oncosomes, and microparticles have been associated with communicating anti-cancer drug-resistance. The in vitro, pre-clinical in vivo and patients' data linking EVs to drug-resistance (and the specific drugs involved) in breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, haematological malignancies, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, melanoma...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Reviews on Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Concerns expressed that opportunities to save lives may be missedCancer patients in the UK may not receive enough follow-up after a diagnosis, a new study by researchers in Chicago suggests.The study, presented at the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, suggests five years of monitoring is insufficient for some cancers and too long for others. The research suggests some NHS patients may receive too few years of follow-up care.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Cancer Cancer research Breast cancer Bowel cancer Cervical cancer Lung cancer Ovarian cancer Pancreas cancer Prostate cancer Health Medical research Science Society UK news Source Type: news
Cancer is one of the leading causes of death among Americans. At least 10 percent of cancers are caused by inherited mutations in genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Parents with the cancer gene mutation have a 50 percent chance of passing it on to a son or daughter. It ’s well-known that women with BRCA are at a very high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Less known is the fact that men with these mutations also are at risk of breast cancer and other cancers.Astudy published in April in JAMA Oncology finds that few men are screened for these genetic mutations — and the researchers strongly suggest that they be sc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Authors: Wang Y, Lan GB, Peng FH, Xie XB Abstract Renal transplantation is associated with an increased risk of cancers at multiple sites; however, the relationships between increased cancer risk and participant characteristics remain unclear. We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to identify prospective observational studies performed up to July 2017. Totally 11 prospective studies reported data on 79,988 renal transplant recipients were included. Renal transplant recipients were found to display a higher risk of all cancers (standard incidence ratio [SIR]: 2.89; 95% CI: 2.13-3.91; P
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Home delivery for everything from fresh produce to custom-selected clothing has become a way of life for many Americans. While most home-delivery conveniences are generally changing our lives for the better — giving us more time and choices — at-home genetics kits that reveal information about the risk of developing certain cancers represent a risky step in our on-demand culture. The FDA recently gave 23andMe the green light to sell the first direct-to-consumer tests for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which are linked to serious risks of developing cancer. All a buyer has to do is s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Genetics Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs
In this study, we estimated the pair-wise genetic correlation between six cancer types (breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate) using cancer-specific GWAS summary statistics data based on 66,958 case and 70,665 control subjects of European ancestry. We also estimated genetic correlations between cancers and 14 noncancer diseases and traits. Results: After adjusting for 15 pair-wise genetic correlation tests between cancers, we found significant (P
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Articles Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1 McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada 2 Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Barcelona, Spain 3 Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain 4 CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain 5 School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada 6 Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 7 Department of Economics, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA 8 Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Cana...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Abstract Familial risks of breast cancer (BC) are well established but whether BC clusters with other, i.e. discordant, cancers is less certain but of interest for the identification of common genetic and possible environmental factors contributing to a general cancer susceptibility. We apply a novel approach to search for familial associations of BC with other (discordant) cancers based on the Swedish Family‐Cancer Database. Relative risks (RRs) were calculated for BC in families with increasing numbers of patients with discordant cancer X, and conversely, familial RRs for cancer X in families with increasing numbers of...
Source: International Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Phosphatases and cancer have been related for many years now, as these enzymes regulate key cellular functions, including cell survival, migration, differentiation and proliferation. Dysfunctions or mutations affecting these enzymes have been demonstrated to be key factors for oncogenesis. The aim of this review is to shed light on the role of four different phosphatases (PTEN, PP2A, CDC25 and DUSP1) in five different solid tumors (breast cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and ovarian cancer), in order to better understand the most frequent and aggressive primary cancer of the central nervous system, glioblastoma.
Source: Biochemical Journal - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
Abstract Phosphatases and cancer have been related for many years now, as these enzymes regulate key cellular functions, including cell survival, migration, differentiation and proliferation. Dysfunctions or mutations affecting these enzymes have been demonstrated to be key factors for oncogenesis. The aim of this review is to shed light on the role of four different phosphatases (PTEN, PP2A, CDC25 and DUSP1) in five different solid tumors (breast cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and ovarian cancer), in order to better understand the most frequent and aggressive primary cancer of the central...
Source: The Biochemical Journal - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochem J Source Type: research
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