Researchers Discover New Mesothelioma Blood Biomarker

An international team of scientists recently identified a new blood biomarker for mesothelioma that should help with early diagnosis, prognosis accuracy and the personalization of treatment. Researchers identified activin A, a protein complex found in the blood, as a potential target for future therapies. “Blood derived biomarkers are important because they can be noninvasively measured, even at multiple stages,” Dr. Balazs Hegedus, at the Medical University of Vienna in Austria, told Asbestos.com. “They can help make the best personalized therapeutic decisions.” In addition to Hegedus, cancer specialists from Hungary, Switzerland and Australia participated in the study published in the latest issue of European Journal of Cancer. They measured the activin A levels of 129 patients in four locations, 16 patients with nonmalignant pleural diseases and 45 healthy people for a comparison. Researchers found significantly higher activin A levels in patients with mesothelioma and increased tumor volume correlated directly with the higher levels of the circulating protein. They also discovered patients with lower levels of activin A at diagnosis lived significantly longer. Activin A Helps with Histology The patients with nonmalignant diseases had only a slight increase in activin A, which also helped determine the histological classification of mesothelioma. Those with sarcomatoid and biphasic mesothelioma — the two toughest types to treat — had sig...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: activin A asbestos cancer asbestos diseases Balazs Hegedus cancer treatment mesothelioma mesothelioma biomarker mesothelioma blood biomarker mesothelioma research multimodal cancer therapy treatments for mesothelioma Source Type: news

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Thoracic surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron and the Pacific Mesothelioma Center moved closer to a major treatment advance by obtaining U.S. patent approval for their novel mesenchymal stem cell research program. The patent approval in February makes the research program more attractive to potential investors who could accelerate development and change the way malignant mesothelioma is treated. “This is a big deal in the developmental path for MSC [mesenchymal stem cell] therapy,” Patent Adviser Dr. Walid Sabbagh told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “The patent is a pathway to really help these cancer pat...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusion: The approaches of this review are to highlight the recent management advances and contrast the differences of treatment practice between Western and Asian countries.
Source: Current Cancer Therapy Reviews - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: acupuncture cancer Alternative medicine alternative mesothelioma treatment alternative therapy survival alternative vs conventional medicine breast cancer colon cancer Conventional cancer treatments Dr. David Gorski Dr. Skyler Johnson Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Abramson Cancer Center Aduro Biotech CRS-207 Dr. Tawee Tanvetyanon FDA approval Keytruda improving mesothelioma prognosis Merck mesothelioma chemotherapy mesothelioma clinical trials mesothelioma immunotherapy moffitt cancer center m Source Type: news
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