Tips for Training Caregivers to Communicate With Dementia Patients

As a speech-language pathologist with a passion for geriatric care, I can’t help but notice how disenfranchisement of seniors seems to increasingly creep into our society. I see many seniors—both healthy and especially those with impairments—becoming more and more invisible in our fast-paced internet-driven world. Practically everyone has their noses buried in an iPhone or other device and face-to-face communication gets lost except for the FaceTime app users! I think SLPs and other professionals in our field learn to respect an individual and how to provide compassionate care for other human beings. These valuable skills may not get taught to everyone. I especially regard the communication rights of individuals who lost their ability to participate as a “voice” in society due to neurogenic communication disorders. Of all the patients with aphasia, Parkinson’s and dementia I treat, perhaps the most challenging aspect involves seeing the decline of the communication partnership between paid caregivers and an individual with language loss or confusion due to Alzheimer’s disease. Although these clients seemingly lose their identity, there’s still a person with a history of hopes, dreams, lives, interests and ambitions. SLPs can improve caregivers’ relationships with dementia patients by devoting patient education hours to training the caregivers. The MESSAGE and RECAPS program developed by Liddle and colleagues summarizes som...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech Therapy Authors: Tags: Speech-Language Pathology Alzheimer's Cognitive Rehabilitation dementia Source Type: blogs

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https://flip.it/eV9Piy******************************************Kevin S. McGrew, PhDEducational&School PsychologistDirectorInstitute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP)https://www.themindhub.com******************************************
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that, although persons with disabilities can exhibit a wide functional range, they remain at risk of PUs and should be evaluated for proper preventive measures, including support surfaces and wheelchair cushions. PMID: 32058440 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Adv Data - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: Adv Skin Wound Care Source Type: research
Publication date: 1 April 2020Source: Journal of Molecular Liquids, Volume 303Author(s): Aafiya Tarannum, Nitin P. Lobo, J. Raghava Rao, N. Nishad FathimaAbstractIdentification of biocompatible cross-linkers is extremely important in the field of biomaterials, as it aids in improving stability to protein but also elicits less immune response. Towards this, aqueous solution of choline-based ILs (CILs) has been keyed out as biocompatible cross-linkers with an aim to understand their impact and effect on stabilization of collagen. The changes in the hydration dynamics of collagen treated with aqueous solution of CILs has been...
Source: Journal of Molecular Liquids - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
Authors: Moye J PMID: 32056514 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Clinical Gerontologist - Category: Geriatrics Tags: Clin Gerontol Source Type: research
Authors: Graul AI, Pina P, Tracy M, Sorbera L Abstract Highlights of our annual review of new approvals and launches on global drug markets include the approval and launch of Trikafta, the most widely applicable treatment to date for cystic fibrosis; approval of the first Ebola vaccine for general (rather than emergency) use; the pilot rollout in three African countries of the world's first malaria vaccine; approval of a new treatment option for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections; and the approval and launch in China of the first new drug to treat Alzheimer's disease in more than a decade. Several new immune ...
Source: Drugs of Today - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drugs Today (Barc) Source Type: research
Authors: Gajofatto A, Turatti M Abstract Siponimod fumarate (BAF-312) is a synthetic sphingosine 1- phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator, which exerts immunomodulating effects mediated by B- and T-cell sequestration in secondary lymphoid organs. S1P receptor modulators have consistently shown a significant benefit on relapse rate and other measures of disease activity in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS), compared with both placebo and active comparator. However, most clinical trials of S1P receptor modulators--as well as other therapies for MS--lack evidence of a significant benefit on disability progr...
Source: Drugs of Today - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drugs Today (Barc) Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Filip Kosel, Jessica M.S. Pelley, Tamara B. FranklinAbstractTransgenic mouse models have been used extensively to model the cognitive impairments arising from Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related pathology. However, less is known about the relationship between AD-related pathology and the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) commonly presented by patients. This review discusses the BPSD-like behaviours recapitulated by several mouse models of AD-related pathology, including the APP/PS1, Tg2576...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
In this issue of JAMA, Lee and colleagues examine the association between Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST), which involve portable medical orders that document treatment limitations for out-of-hospital emergency care and for limiting overtreatment at the end of life. The authors studied adults with chronic life-limiting illnesses who were hospitalized within the last 6 months of life and who had completed a POLST before their last inpatient admission. Among 1818 patients enrolled, 656 (36%) had POLST orders for “full treatment” and 1162 had orders for either “limited additional inter...
Source: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Photo credit Imon Godfrey Dear Carol:  My parents are in their 80s and have been fortunate with their health, but I worry about how they will do in the future. They still live in their home which we have made safer with some upgrades so that’s going fine for now. Any help they’ve needed has been provided by family members without too much disruption, so we consider ourselves fortunate. What worries me is that while I don’t see signs of actual dementia, at least from what I know about it, I do see them filling in for each other more often when it comes to words. Should we be worried about them and the...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
In this study, the Aβ-labeling ability of CRANAD-28 was investigated in further detail using histological staining to assess different criteria, including stained Aβ plaque brightness, Aβ plaque size, and Aβ plaque number count. The results of this study demonstrated CRANAD-28 to be superior across all criteria assessed. Furthermore, CRANAD-28 and IBA-1 antibody were used to label Aβ-plaques and microglia respectively. Statistical analysis with Spearman regression revealed a statistically significant negative correlation between the size of labeled Aβ plaques and surrou...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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