Progesterone supplements don’t help prevent miscarriage

This study suggests that trying again and again may be the answer, and as difficult as that may sound, it does provide hope for couples that they will eventually have a healthy pregnancy. Related Post:Miscarriage: Keep breaking the silenceTreating unexplained infertility: Answers still neededAn obstetrician (who is also a feminist) weighs in on the…Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: When it’s more than just…Antidepressants and pregnancy: More research neededThe post Progesterone supplements don’t help prevent miscarriage appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Family Planning and Pregnancy Health Women's Health Source Type: news

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For infertility patients, an IVF cycle can feel like a numbers game. How many follicles are developing well? How many oocytes are retrieved? How many will fertilize? And most important, how many embryos will be ready to transfer into the womb? Although many people say “it only takes one,” I have found that most people going through in vitro fertilization (IVF) are hoping for several. Why do people hope for several embryos? If it only takes one, why hope for more? For those struggling with infertility, safety in numbers may feel heartening. Some families hope to have more than one child, and welcome the chance t...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fertility Infertility Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Authors: Lopes LS, Esteves SC Abstract In recent years, growing evidence has challenged the notion that sperm quantity and quality are not essential for the success of assisted reproductive technology. DNA fragmentation assessments on ejaculated and testicular sperm harvested from non-azoospermic infertile men have reported a remarkable decrease in DNA damage in spermatozoa directly retrieved from the seminiferous tubules. Moreover, emerging evidence using molecular genetic techniques indicates that aneuploidy rates are lower in testicular sperm than in ejaculated counterparts. The use of testicular sperm from non-...
Source: Panminerva Medica - Category: General Medicine Tags: Panminerva Med Source Type: research
In this study, vaginal microbiome was divided in five biotypes, being four of them dominated by lactobacilli and considered as healthy (pH 5.0) and higher diversity. In a healthy status, microbiota is balanced and forms a stable ecological unit dominated by Lactobacillus species, which fixes pH below 5.0 and controls non-desirable groups. In a pathogenic process, the microbiome shifts to a dysbiotic state, in which lactobacilli drop, pH is increased to values above 4.5 and other groups such as Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, and Streptococcus, among others, can overgrow (Srinivasan et al., 2012). Short chain fatty acid...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: At present, there is no high-quality evidence to support the routine use of hysteroscopy as a screening tool in the general population of subfertile women with a normal ultrasound or hysterosalpingogram in the basic fertility work-up for improving reproductive success rates.In women undergoing IVF, low-quality evidence, including all of the studies reporting these outcomes, suggests that performing a screening hysteroscopy before IVF may increase live birth and clinical pregnancy rates. However, pooled results from the only two trials with a low risk of bias did not show a benefit of screening hysteroscopy bef...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Jie Cai1†, Yi Zhang1†, Yuying Wang1, Shengxian Li1, Lihua Wang1, Jun Zheng1, Yihong Jiang1, Ying Dong1, Huan Zhou1, Yaomin Hu1, Jing Ma1, Wei Liu1,2*† and Tao Tao1*† 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Pudong, China 2Shanghai Key Laboratory for Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Center for Reproductive Medicine, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Pudong, China Background: Infertility and dyslipidemia are frequently present in both women...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Di Che1†, Yanfang Yang2†, Yufen Xu1†, Zhenzhen Fang3, Lei Pi1, LanYan Fu1, Huazhong Zhou1, Yaqian Tan1, Zhaoliang Lu1, Li Li4, Qihua Liang5, Qingshan Xuan4* and Xiaoqiong Gu1,5,6* 1Department of Clinical Biological Resource Bank, Guangzhou Institute of Pediatrics, Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Prenatal Diagnosis, Maoming People’s Hospital, Maoming, China 3Program of Molecular Medicine, Guangzhou Women and Children’s Hospital, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China 4...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Abstract CASE PRESENTATION: A 32-year-old Nigerian woman, who became pregnant after undergoing in vitro fertilization, was admitted with nausea and abdominal pain. She had a history of two miscarriages and infertility because of tubal blockage treated by salpingectomy. One week prior, she presented to an outside hospital with premature rupture of membranes resulting in stillborn delivery of twins. Endometrial cultures from dilatation and curettage grew Escherichia coli, and she was started on a fluoroquinolone for chorioamnionitis. PMID: 30955580 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Chest - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Chest Source Type: research
This study provides an update and comprehensive evidence to support the observation that despite the fact that PCOS patients achieve better clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate, physicians should continue to consider patients with PCOS to be high risk of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes.
Source: Reproductive BioMedicine Online - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Conventional semen analysis parameters are not sufficient to evaluate male fertility potential and are not predictive of sperm function. Sperm DNA damage has been identified as a major contributor to male factor infertility and poor IVF outcome due to impaired embryo development. It increases time to pregnancy, hampers and increases the embryo cleavage time, increases miscarriage rates, increases the risk of pregnancy loss after IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm  injection (ICSI), and increases birth defects in the offspring (1).
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 March 2019Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive GynecologyAuthor(s): Aarathi Cholkeri-Singh, Ina Zamfirova, Charles E. MillerAbstractStudy ObjectivePrimary objective is to determine whether incorporation of operative hysteroscopy with biopsy of products of conception, in conjunction with a suction curettage for a first trimester missed abortion, affected the rate of maternal cell contamination when chromosomal analysis was performed on the products of conception. Secondary objective was to determine the rates of retained products of conception with incorporation of hysteroscopy post su...
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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