Infertility On Father's Day: The Facts For Men

Men so often are left out of the infertility equation. We typically associate infertility as being a female challenge. Why? Because anyone who hasn't had first-hand experience with fertility struggles of any sort is unaware of what an important part men play in the intricate process of trying to conceive, not just physically but emotionally as well. Putting aside the vast array of male infertility challenges that exist and the helplessness that a man feels when he is diagnosed with one of these conditions know this: No matter how or why men are faced with this painful life situation, they too, hurt, struggle and yearn for a child and so often do not have a support system of their own in place to get them through this painful experience. This Father's Day, I would like to acknowledge all the men who are suffering in silence and encourage them to find their own personal path to smoothly and soundly moving through this sensitive time. The Facts When a couple is faced with an infertility struggle of any kind, the woman almost always must undergo one or more procedures; specifically when using any form of reproductive technology like in vitro or insemination. It is within her that an embryo would find a home and so by default she plays a significant role in the process. Naturally, men must take on the part of "supporter" in order to alleviate any pain, discomfort or pressure that their partner is experiencing. It is my belief that when anyone takes on any role...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 14 February 2018 Source:Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology Author(s): Bansari G. Patel, Emily E. Lenk, Dan I. Lebovic, Yimin Shu, Jie Yu, Robert N. Taylor Despite an estimated prevalence of 11% in women and plausible historical descriptions dating back to the 17th century, the etiology of endometriosis remains poorly understood. Classical theories of the histological origins of endometriosis are reviewed below. Clinical presentations are variable and signs and symptoms do not correlate well with the extent of disease. In this summary we have attempted to s...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Yang HL, Mei J, Chang KK, Zhou WJ, Huang LQ, Li MQ Abstract Endometriosis (EMS) is a common gynecologic disease that causes chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and infertility in women. The doctrine of menstruation back flow planting and defects in the immune system are well known and widely accepted. In recent years, increasing studies have been focused on the role of autophagy in EMS, and have shown that autophagy plays a vital role in EMS. Autophagy, which is known as the non-apoptotic form of programmed cell death induced by a large number of intracellular/extracellular stimuli, is the major cellular pa...
Source: American Journal of Translational Research - Category: Research Tags: Am J Transl Res Source Type: research
As The Author of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories, I'm honored to be chosen to be part AlzAuthors. This post is courtesy of AlzAuthors. Read through for some incredible deals on ebooks written by authors who've been where you are. MOE is among the books on sale. All are $2.99 or less. November is National Caregiver Appreciation Month, a time to recognize the long hours, sacrifice, and love all caregivers bring to the task of caring for a loved one with dementia or any long-term illness. In honor of their efforts, AlzAuthors is hosting an eBook sale and giveaway! This is a terrific way f...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
When my first period came at age 13, it involved blood clots and extreme pain. I didn’t know what to expect or what was considered “normal,” but thankfully, my mother did. She recognized that my symptoms were unusual and immediately took me to see my pediatrician. I was first prescribed birth control pills, which seemed to help initially, but when my period remained heavy and painful, I was put on a different birth control pill that enabled me to have my period only four times a year. I thought my situation was normal – albeit uncomfortable and inconvenient. No one ever suggested that painful period...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Teen Health endometriosis Marc Laufer Source Type: news
Conclusion This large study found an association between having the MeNZB vaccine and a reduced likelihood of being diagnosed with gonorrhoea. But it's difficult to form any firm conclusions because of the nature of the case and control groups. For example, given that both groups were sexually active, we don't know why the majority of people with gonorrhoea didn't also have a chlamydia infection, and how this may have affected the results. It could just be down to pure chance and have nothing to do with the vaccine. So before we celebrate the alleged "cure of gonorrhoea", there are many things to consider: T...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news
Conclusion The increase in antimicrobial resistance towards drugs used to treat gonorrhoea is reaching a critical stage, especially given how common the infection is worldwide, with an estimated 78 million new cases in 2012. This study raises concerns around an important topic while also proposing strategies to help address the slow pace of research and development of new drugs. The prevention of gonorrhoea is equally, if not more, important. The most effective way to prevent gonorrhoea is to always use a condom during sex, including anal and oral sex. Read more advice about sexually transmitted infections and how to prev...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication QA articles Source Type: news
ConclusionsWomen with AIS experience slightly elevated rates of nulliparity, infertility treatment, prepartum back pain, and peripartum curve progression. However, most women are able to have children and are not at increased risk of pregnancy-related complications. Higher quality evidence is needed to better define these relationships and allow more guided counseling and treatment.
Source: European Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Your girlfriend, sister or coworker has just texted you the news of her pregnancy loss. Maybe you’ve known she was pregnant from the beginning, and had been excitedly walking with her every step of the way until this setback. Maybe this is the first news you’re getting that she was even pregnant in the first place.  No matter what the situation, it isn’t always clear what you can do to help a person going through it, say experts who specialize in supporting women through pregnancy loss. While every person will have unique needs, there is one rule of thumb, according to Kate Metten, a birth and postpa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
I’m a black woman with uterine fibroids. These noncancerous growths, also called intramural fibroids, line the muscular wall of my uterus. Technically benign, they threaten to grow into larger, painful masses that could ultimately rob me of the ability to bear children. Fibroids are common in all women, but research suggests that African American women are significantly more likely to develop uterine fibroids. In fact, in addition to a family history of fibroids, being African American is at the top of the list of causes for the condition. And black women aren’t only at a higher risk for developing fibroids. Th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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