Better Outcomes for Patients will Provide Better Business Outcomes

It will not have escaped your attention that ‘patient centricity’ has become something of a catchphrase in the last couple of years: mission statements and company announcements are full of it. Cynics have yet to be convinced, but some believers in pharma are working to win them over. John McCarthy, VP Global Commercial Excellence at AstraZeneca, thinks he has the tools to make the idea something more concrete. The international team he leads has a daunting remit: to build and deliver capabilities to drive commercial success, transform the healthcare experience and improve the lives of millions of patients. Measuring the journey In short, he is leading the charge to make AstraZeneca a patient-centric organization. To know you are achieving this broad and ambitious set of aims requires a laser-like focus on outcomes, and McCarthy believes it is vital to build in measurement from the start. However, there may be a limit to the usefulness of traditional KPIs in this environment. “There are many ways to measure along this journey,” McCarthy says. “We’re probably not measuring patient centricity at a corporate level just yet, but if you’re doing journey mapping and understand the problems, that is probably a measure. KPIs too often bring you back to the business outcome only.” Instead, he suggests, you need to look for evidence that you are solving a problem for patients. The $64 million question which follows on from this – an...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

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AbstractAutophagy is crucial for the removal of dysfunctional organelles and protein aggregates and for maintaining stem cell homeostasis, which includes self-renewal, cell differentiation and somatic reprogramming. Loss of self-renewal capacity and pluripotency is a major obstacle to stem cell-based therapies. It has been reported that autophagy regulates stem cells under biological stimuli, starvation, hypoxia, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular senescence. On the one hand, autophagy is shown to play roles in self-renewal by co-function with the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to promote pluripote...
Source: Cell and Tissue Research - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 18 October 2018Source: Cell, Volume 175, Issue 3Author(s): Kaiwei Liang, Edwin R. Smith, Yuki Aoi, Kristen L. Stoltz, Hiroaki Katagi, Ashley R. Woodfin, Emily J. Rendleman, Stacy A. Marshall, David C. Murray, Lu Wang, Patrick A. Ozark, Rama K. Mishra, Rintaro Hashizume, Gary E. Schiltz, Ali ShilatifardSummaryThe super elongation complex (SEC) is required for robust and productive transcription through release of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with its P-TEFb module and promoting transcriptional processivity with its ELL2 subunit. Malfunction of SEC contributes to multiple human diseases including cancer. Here...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 18 October 2018Source: Cell, Volume 175, Issue 3Author(s): Vishal Singh, Beng San Yeoh, Benoit Chassaing, Xia Xiao, Piu Saha, Rodrigo Aguilera Olvera, John D. Lapek, Limin Zhang, Wei-Bei Wang, Sijie Hao, Michael D. Flythe, David J. Gonzalez, Patrice D. Cani, Jose R. Conejo-Garcia, Na Xiong, Mary J. Kennett, Bina Joe, Andrew D. Patterson, Andrew T. Gewirtz, Matam Vijay-KumarSummaryDietary soluble fibers are fermented by gut bacteria into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), which are considered broadly health-promoting. Accordingly, consumption of such fibers ameliorates metabolic syndrome. However, incorporati...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 18 October 2018Source: Cell, Volume 175, Issue 3Author(s): David A. Quigley, Ha X. Dang, Shuang G. Zhao, Paul Lloyd, Rahul Aggarwal, Joshi J. Alumkal, Adam Foye, Vishal Kothari, Marc D. Perry, Adina M. Bailey, Denise Playdle, Travis J. Barnard, Li Zhang, Jin Zhang, Jack F. Youngren, Marcin P. Cieslik, Abhijit Parolia, Tomasz M. Beer, George Thomas, Kim N. Chi
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 October 2018Source: CellAuthor(s): Nazar Mashtalir, Andrew R. D’Avino, Brittany C. Michel, Jie Luo, Joshua Pan, Jordan E. Otto, Hayley J. Zullow, Zachary M. McKenzie, Rachel L. Kubiak, Roodolph St. Pierre, Alfredo M. Valencia, Steven J. Poynter, Seth H. Cassel, Jeffrey A. Ranish, Cigall KadochSummaryMammalian SWI/SNF (mSWI/SNF) ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are multi-subunit molecular machines that play vital roles in regulating genomic architecture and are frequently disrupted in human cancer and developmental disorders. To date, the modular organization and pathw...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 October 2018Source: CellAuthor(s): Matthew M. Gubin, Ekaterina Esaulova, Jeffrey P. Ward, Olga N. Malkova, Daniele Runci, Pamela Wong, Takuro Noguchi, Cora D. Arthur, Wei Meng, Elise Alspach, Ruan F.V. Medrano, Catrina Fronick, Michael Fehlings, Evan W. Newell, Robert S. Fulton, Kathleen C.F. Sheehan, Stephen T. Oh, Robert D. Schreiber, Maxim N. ArtyomovSummaryAlthough current immune-checkpoint therapy (ICT) mainly targets lymphoid cells, it is associated with a broader remodeling of the tumor micro-environment. Here, using complementary forms of high-dimensional profiling, we define d...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 October 2018Source: CellAuthor(s): Aleksandra Wroblewska, Maxime Dhainaut, Benjamin Ben-Zvi, Samuel A. Rose, Eun Sook Park, El-Ad David Amir, Anela Bektesevic, Alessia Baccarini, Miriam Merad, Adeeb H. Rahman, Brian D. BrownSummaryCRISPR pools are being widely employed to identify gene functions. However, current technology, which utilizes DNA as barcodes, permits limited phenotyping and bulk-cell resolution. To enable novel screening capabilities, we developed a barcoding system operating at the protein level. We synthesized modules encoding triplet combinations of linear epitopes to ...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Editor’s Note: This essay contains excerpts from Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life, coming February 21st, 2017 from Penguin-Random House. A few years ago, while at a family get-together, I sat across from a retired hospice social worker named Terry. I am a physician whose practice alternates between attending on the wards of an inner-city intensive care unit and serving as a consultant on the hospital’s palliative care team. I didn’t set out to practice this uncommon combination of medical specialties. I started out totally dedicated to using the miraculous technologies in my crit...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: End of Life & Serious Illness Health Professionals Hospitals 30-day mortality statistic advance directive Palliative Care Source Type: blogs
I am in a perpetual abusive relationship with hypochondria; I desperately want to get away from it, but somehow it controls my brain. I've had hypochondriac tendencies (more officially known as "illness anxiety disorder") for as long as I can remember. I'm not sure who or what to blame and the source of the disorder is irrelevant; it's the cure I'm after. Hypothesis theories for my hypochondria: Throughout my childhood, my mother perpetually complained of a bad heart and threatened to faint, falling back on her stash of smelling salts in her purse. The best birthday present I ever got was the Merck Medical Ma...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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