Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy may eliminate colorectal cancer

An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. A novel radioimmunotherapy combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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In this study, and at least to the best of our knowledge, maize polyamine oxidase (ZmPAO) was used for the first time with the aim of identifying a novel strategy for cancer therapy. The cytotoxicity and the mechanisms of cell death induced by the enzymatic oxidation products of polyamine generated by ZmPAO were investigated. Exogenous spermine and ZmPAO treatment decreased cell viability in a spermine dose‑ and time‑dependent manner, particularly, the viability of the multidrug‑resistant (MDR) colon adenocarcinoma cells, LoVo DX, when compared with drug‑sensitive ones (LoVo WT). Further analyses rev...
Source: International Journal of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Int J Oncol Source Type: research
Abstract Emergence of novel treatment modalities provides effective therapeutic options, apart from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, to fight against colorectal cancer. Unfortunately, drug resistance remains a huge challenge in clinics, leading to invariable occurrence of disease progression after treatment initiation. While novel drug development is unfavorable in terms of time frame and costs, drug repurposing is one of the promising strategies to combat resistance. This approach refers to the application of clinically available drugs to treat a different disease. With the well-established safety profile and...
Source: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Mol Life Sci Source Type: research
Wim J. Quax Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered as a promising anti-cancer therapeutic. However, many cancers have been found to be or to become inherently resistant to TRAIL. A combination of epigenetic modifiers, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi’s), with TRAIL was effective to overcome TRAIL resistance in some cancers. Broad spectrum HDACi’s, however, show considerable toxicity constraining clinical use. Since overexpression of class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) has been found in colon tumors relative to normal mucosa, we have focused on small...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Colon cancer is one of the three common malignant tumors, with lower 5 years survival rate. Akt is an important therapeutic target, while SC66 is a novel allosteric AKT inhibitor, which enhances the therapeuti...
Source: Cancer Cell International - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Primary research Source Type: research
The targeting of non‑coding RNAs by curcumin: Facts and hopes for cancer therapy (Review). Oncol Rep. 2019 May 03;: Authors: Liu Y, Sun H, Makabel B, Cui Q, Li J, Su C, Ashby CR, Chen Z, Zhang J Abstract Curcumin [(1E,6E)‑1,7‑bis(4‑hydroxy‑3‑-methoxyphenyl) hepta‑1,6‑diene‑3,5‑dione] is a natural polyphenol that is derived from the turmeric plant (curcuma longa L.). Curcumin is widely used in food coloring, preservatives, and condiments. Curcumin possesses anti‑tumor, anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory efficacy, as well as other pharmacological effects. Emerging evidence ind...
Source: Oncology Reports - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Rep Source Type: research
We reported that Caco-2 cancer cells are more sensitive than HCT 116 cancer cells to nano-DOX and nano-Se. Nano-DOX plus nano-Se induces cytotoxicity-mediated late apoptosis in Caco-2 more than HCT 116 cell lines. This de novo strategy could have great power to overcome the problem of DOX resistance during colon cancer therapy. PMID: 31066020 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Biological Trace Element Research - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Biol Trace Elem Res Source Type: research
Selecting the first chemical molecule inhibitor of HSP110 for colorectal cancer therapy, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41418-019-0343-4Selecting the first chemical molecule inhibitor of HSP110 for colorectal cancer therapy
Source: Cell Death and Differentiation - Category: Cytology Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, we evaluated QOL after HIPEC for peritoneal mesothelioma.MethodsThis was a prospective study performed after HIPEC for peritoneal mesothelioma between 2002 and 2015. Patients completed QOL surveys, including the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy  + Colon (FACT-C), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively.ResultsOverall, 46 patients underwent HIPEC for peritoneal mesothelioma and completed QOL surveys. Mean age was 52.8  ± 13.8 ...
Source: Annals of Surgical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Marjolein Schluck1,2, Roel Hammink1,2, Carl G. Figdor1,2,3, Martijn Verdoes1,3*† and Jorieke Weiden1,2,3*† 1Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands 2Division of Immunotherapy, Oncode Institute, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands 3Institute for Chemical Immunology, Nijmegen, Netherlands Traditional tumor vaccination approaches mostly focus on activating dendritic cells (DCs) by providing them with a source of tumor antigens and/or adjuvants, which in turn activate tumor-reactive T c...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Discussion MDSCs violently emerge in pathological conditions in an attempt to limit potentially harmful immune and inflammatory responses. Mechanisms supporting their expansion and survival are deeply investigated in cancer, in the perspective to reactivate specific antitumor responses and prevent their contribution to disease evolution. These findings will likely contribute to improve the targeting of MDSCs in anticancer immunotherapies, either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. New evidence indicates that the expansion of myeloid cell differentiation in pathology is subject to fine-tuning, as its...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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