Using natural products to promote caspase-8-dependent cancer cell death

Abstract The selective killing of cancer cells without toxicity to normal nontransformed cells is an idealized goal of cancer therapy. Thus, there has been much interest in tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a protein that appears to selectively kill cancer cells. TRAIL has been reported to trigger apoptosis and under some circumstances, an alternate death signaling pathway termed necroptosis. The relative importance of necroptosis for cell death induction in vivo is under intensive investigation. Nonetheless, many cancer cells (particularly those freshly isolated from cancer patients) are highly resistant to TRAIL-mediated cell death. Therefore, there is an underlying interest in identifying agents that can be combined with TRAIL to improve its efficacy. There are numerous reports in which combination of TRAIL with standard antineoplastic drugs has resulted in enhanced cancer cell death in vitro. However, many of these chemotherapeutic drugs are nonspecific and associated with adverse effects, which raise serious concerns for cancer therapy in patients. By contrast, natural products have been shown to be safer and efficacious alternatives. Recently, a number of studies have suggested that certain natural products when combined with TRAIL can enhance cancer cell death. In this review, we highlight molecular pathways that might be targeted by various natural products to promote cell death, and focus on our recent work with withanolides a...
Source: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Authors: Shan C, Li X, Zhang J Abstract Immune checkpoint inhibition has been shown to successfully reactivate T cell responses directed against tumor-associated antigens, resulting in significantly prolonged overall survival in patients with various types of solid tumors. Among them, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) play key roles in tumor immune escape and are well-established targets of cancer immunotherapy. However, the low response rate PD-1 and CTLA-4 is a limitation and a challenge. Hence, studies have focused on investigating the tumor microenvironment for...
Source: Oncology Letters - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Lett Source Type: research
Authors: Zhu L, Yang X, Zhong D, Xie S, Shi W, Li Y, Hou X, HuaYao, Zhou H, Zhao M, Ding Z, Zhao X, Mo F, Yin S, Liu A, Lu X Abstract Retargeting the antigen-binding specificity of T cells to intracellular antigens that are degraded and presented on the tumor surface by engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), also named TCR-like antibody CAR-T, remains limited. With the exception of the commercialized CD19 CAR-T for hematological malignancies and other CAR-T therapies aiming mostly at extracellular antigens achieving great success, the rareness and scarcity of TCR-like CAR-T therapies might be due to their cur...
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
Ferroptosis is a newly described type of programmed cell death and intensively related to both maintaining homeostasis and the development of diseases, especially cancers. Inducing ferroptosis leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and toxic lipid peroxidation in cells, which plays a pivotal role in suppressing cancer growth and progression. Here, we reviewed the existing studies about the molecular mechanisms of ferroptosis involved in different antitumor treatments, such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. We focused in particular on the distinct combinatorial therapeutic effects such as the s...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionsWhether or not these findings will be confirmed remains to be seen when market approval to cover more indications is extended and new effective immunotherapeutic agents become available.
Source: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Contributors : Michael Green ; Xueting Lang ; Weiping ZouSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensImmune checkpoint blockade is a powerful oncologic treatment modality for a wide variety of human malignancies. Randomized clinical trials are assessing how best to interdigitate this treatment modality with traditional therapies including radiotherapy. A challenge in oncology is to rationally and effectively integrate immunotherapy with traditional modalities including radiotherapy. Here, we demonstrate that radiotherapy induces tumor cell ferroptosis. Ferroptosis agonists augment...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
This study reveals a mechanism underlying the anticancer effects of IFN. Some ISGs, as represented by ISG12a, may be useful in cancer therapy and prevention. The identified interrelations among innate immunity, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and cancer immunity may provide new insight into strategies that will improve the efficiency of immunotherapy. PMID: 32963356 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cellular and Molecular Immunology - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Cell Mol Immunol Source Type: research
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Immunotherapy has become the mainstay for lung cancer treatment, providing sustained therapeutic responses and improved prognosis compared with those obtained with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and targeted therapy. It has the potential for anti-tumor treatment and killing tumor cells by activating human immunity and has moved the targets of anti-cancer therapy from malignant tumor cells to immune cell subsets. Two kinds of immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), are the main targets of current immunot...
Source: Chinese Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Chin Med J (Engl) Source Type: research
Lymphocyte-based immunotherapy has emerged as a breakthrough in cancer therapy for both hematologic and solid malignancies. In a subpopulation of cancer patients, this powerful therapeutic modality converts malignancy to clinically manageable disease. However, the T cell- and chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell-mediated antimetastatic activity, especially their impacts on microscopic...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41571-020-0426-7Natural killer (NK) cells have an innate potential to kill cancerous cells and considerable effort is being focused on innovative approaches to leverage these cells for cancer therapy. Herein, the authors discuss the variety of NK cell-based therapies that are being developed for the treatment of diverse cancers and identify future avenues for NK cell therapy research.
Source: Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Allergy & Immunology | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer Therapy | Immunotherapy | Study | Toxicology