Spreading Depression in Primary and Secondary Headache Disorders.

Spreading Depression in Primary and Secondary Headache Disorders. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2016 Jul;20(7):44 Authors: Chen SP, Ayata C Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Spreading depression (SD) is a wave of simultaneous and near-complete depolarization of virtually all cells in brain tissue associated with a transient "depression" of all spontaneous or evoked electrical activity in the brain. SD is widely accepted as the pathophysiological event underlying migraine aura and may play a role in headache pathogenesis in secondary headache disorders such as ischemic stroke, subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy. Here, we provide an overview of the pathogenic mechanisms and propose plausible hypotheses on the involvement of SD in primary and secondary headache disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: SD can activate downstream trigeminovascular nociceptive pathways to explain the cephalgia in migraine, and possibly in secondary headache disorders as well. In healthy, well-nourished tissue (such as migraine), the intense transmembrane ionic shifts, the cell swelling, and the metabolic and hemodynamic responses associated with SD do not cause tissue injury; however, when SD occurs in metabolically compromised tissue (e.g., in ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury), it can lead to irreversible depolarization, injury, and neuronal death. Recent non-invasive technologies to detect SDs in human brai...
Source: Epilepsy Curr - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Curr Pain Headache Rep Source Type: research

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Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
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Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
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Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
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Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Research has shown that the experience of Childhood Sexual Abuse (CSA) can increase the rates of physical and emotional sequela, including depression, anxiety, PTSD, and physical pain. However, little is known about the healing journeys for those women who...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Over the last 10 years, the rate of adolescents ages 15 to 19 committing suicide in the United States increased drastically, with an overall rate of 6.7 suicides per 100  000 per year in 2007 and a rate of 11.8 per 100 000 per year in 2017.1 The rat...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
This study examines the relationship between the history of abuse and suicide at...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
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