Our Least Experienced Doctors Are Dangerously Tired

Doctors are about the closest thing we have to superheroes in real life. But must they also be super-human? Specifically, can people in the medical profession somehow get by on way less than the seven to nine hours a night that ordinary people require?  That's the operating assumption of the lifestyle expected of medical residents, med school graduates who spend three years learning the profession from supervising doctors. Under the current regulations for resident labor, these doctors-in-training work shifts up to 30 hours long. It's tough to imagine how sleep-deprived residents can function well, but the phenomenon has been the norm for over a century. If you've ever spent a night in a hospital, you've probably been treated by someone who has pulled an all-nighter.  Occasionally, the issue has breached public consciousness: the high-profile case of Libby Zion, the 18-year-old college student who died after being treated by a fatigued intern and resident in 1984, is one instance. But more than 30 years later, a culture of sleep-deprived residents and doctors remains the norm. In the past decade, American hospitals have experimented with letting residents work relatively more humane shifts, capped at 16 hours. But the efforts yielded few improvements in treatment or decreases in hospital errors.  The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the nonprofit council that oversees the graduate medical training programs in American...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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“Once you learn the art of relaxation, everything happens spontaneously and effortlessly.” – Amma During hectic times, it’s tough to remember that relaxation is more than a luxury. In fact, humans need to relax to maintain balance in their lives. Work stress, family strife, and mounting responsibilities can exact a tremendous toll. Relaxing should be at the top of the list as a healthy coping measure and as a rewarding self-gift. Why do we so often neglect this healing self-care? Do you know the healthiest ways to relax your mind, body and soul? Perhaps the biggest obstacle to relaxing is that some ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study will be a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled interventional study in NRS population. The NRS participants are identified using Restorative Sleep Questionnaire-weekly version (RSQ-W) questionnaire. Actigraphy and polysomnography are used for the objective assessment of sleep. The other assessments used are Hamilton Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL) scales, and C-reactive protein. Routine blood and urine analyses will be conducted to assess the safety of treatment. Duration of study for each participant will be 50 days with “day one” for scre...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Study Protocol Clinical Trial Source Type: research
You’re freaked out. A strange person or animal—or thing—is pursuing you. It draws nearer, but you wake up just before it has the chance to get you. It may sound like a cliché. But experts who study nightmares say this is a pretty typical bad-dream scenario. “There’s often some threat of death or injury or annihilation, and you’re trying to escape,” says Tore Nielsen, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Montreal and director of the Dream and Nightmare Laboratory there. If you’ve experienced a traumatic event—a car accident, maybe, or military combat&mda...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news
Conclusion. Modafinil is a central nervous system stimulant with well-established effectiveness in the treatment of narcolepsy and shift-work sleep disorder. There is conflicting evidence about the benefits of modafinil in the treatment of fatigue and EDS secondary to TBI. One randomized, controlled study states that modafinil does not significantly improve patient wakefulness, while another concludes that modafinil corrects EDS but not fatigue. An observational study provides evidence that modafinil increases alertness in fatigued patients with past medical history of brainstem diencephalic stroke or multiple scleros...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review excessive daytime sleep fatigue head injury modafinil stroke TBI traumatic brain injury Source Type: research
Study Objectives:Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic insomnia are two common sleep disorders and both are considered independent risk factors for heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of comorbid insomnia with OSA and to compare its clinical characteristics with those of OSA without insomnia.Methods:Patients who visited two tertiary university hospital sleep centers were screened. Those with a diagnosis of OSA using polysomnography were divided into two groups based on their scores on the Korean version of the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI-K): OSA with insomnia (OSA+I) (ISI-K score≥...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Suicidal ideation and suicide planning were more likely to be endorsed by respondents with sleep apnea compared to those without after accounting for key covariates. Diagnosis of sleep apnea may represent an early opportunity for providers to discuss suicide and mental health with their patients. PMID: 29286590 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: J Clin Psychiatry Source Type: research
Climate change caused by human emissions of greenhouse gases is wreaking havoc on our planet — from heat waves to heavy rainstorms to higher sea levels, the consequences of global warming are far-reaching. The mere thought of the irreversible damage being done to our planet is enough to leave us tossing and turning at night. But as it turns out, there’s a scientific reason that climate change is literally making us lose sleep. Many of us have had the experience of struggling to fall and stay asleep during a heat wave — especially if we don’t have air conditioning. A newly published paper in the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Most people who have looked in the mirror after a sleepless night won't be surprised to hear that a poor night's sleep makes you look less attractive and healthy. It may not be particularly welcome news that your appearance could also put people off talking to you. But the study results show only a very small impact of sleep deprivation on people's perceptions of appearance. While the results are statistically significant, it's hard to know how you would notice a 2% drop in a stranger's willingness to socialise with you. And studies like this, which include only a limited demographic (in this case Swedish stu...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news
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