Older Lung Donors Raise Mortality Risk Only SlightlyOlder Lung Donors Raise Mortality Risk Only Slightly

Pushing the maximum recommended donor age for lung transplants from 55 to 64 years greatly expands the donor pool, with only a slight increase in recipient mortality. However, more research is needed. Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news

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Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Source Type: research
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Source Type: research
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Source Type: research
CRITICAL CARE CLINICS
Source: Critical Care Clinics - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
Lung transplantation is the gold standard for treating patients with end-stage lung disease. Such patients can present with severe illness on the waitlist and may deteriorate before a lung donor is available. Bridging strategies with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are valuable for getting patients to transplant and provide a chance at survival. The current article describes the indications, contraindications, and techniques involved in bridging to lung transplantation with ECMO.
Source: Critical Care Clinics - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsOlder age, lower FEV1 % of predicted, and lower MEP were independently linked to unfavorable outcomes. FACED and BSI were not accurate in predicting mortality in our cohort.
Source: Lung - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 November 2018Source: The Annals of Thoracic SurgeryAuthor(s): Joshua Hsu, Aravind Krishnan, Cheng T. Lin, Pali D. Shah, Stephen R. Broderick, Robert S.D. Higgins, Christian A. Merlo, Errol L. BushAbstractBackgroundSarcopenia, a known component of frailty, defined by diminished cross-sectional area of the psoas muscles, is associated with poor outcomes after a range of surgical procedures. However, little is known of the relationship between sarcopenia of the psoas muscles (SPM) and long-term mortality, decline in pulmonary function, and graft failure after lung transplantation.MethodsW...
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results suggest that even though donor and recipient age may be important in lung transplantation, the interplay between donor and recipient age alone is not an independent determinant of survival. Careful selection of lungs from donors over 60 years old should be exercised, taking into consideration the totality of donor demographics and risk factors rather than dismissing lungs based on advanced age alone
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
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Source: Transplant International - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Invited Commentary Source Type: research
ConclusionsMucormycosis involved mainly the sinu ‐orbital site and affected children>10  years. Despite aggressive treatment with high‐dose L‐AmB and timely surgical debridement, the mortality rate remains still high.
Source: Mycoses - Category: Research Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
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