Apr 22 Cardiology NewsApr 22 Cardiology News

The FDA’s decision on niacin and fenofibric acid, inappropriate carotid screening, same day discharge PCI, gender differences in testing for CAD, and obesity in adolescents are reviewed this week. theheart.org on Medscape
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

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BACKGROUND: Children who experience early adversity are at risk for obesity; secure attachment may be a protective factor as it has been linked to reduced obesity risk. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether (1) participation in a parenting intervention an...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of research on psychosocial concerns following bariatric surgery. RECENT FINDINGS: Bariatric surgery has a positive overall impact on weight and obesity-related comorbidities, as ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Obesity may put trauma patients at risk for complications leading to negative clinical outcomes. Data on all hospital admissions due to traumatic injury in the Detroit metropolitan area...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Introduction: Obesity is associated with characteristic neurocognitive patterns that contribute to the development and maintenance of maladaptive eating behaviors. To date, studies targeting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have successfully reduced appetite and food intake. Nevertheless, the potential of the cerebellum as a target area, given its association with body mass index (BMI), obesity, and appetite-related responses, remains unexplored.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Introduction: Obesity is associated with dysregulation in front-striatal brain regions. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeted to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) could reverse these abnormalities and potentially benefit patients trying to lose weight. To date, however, the experience with tDCS in the context of appetite, food intake and obesity suggests high response variability across individuals. Differences in dopamine neurotransmission may play a role, as they have been linked to tDCS plasticity mechanisms as well as obesity pathophysiology.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Background: Cranial nerves, such as the vagus nerve (CN X), offer an easily accessible pathway to deep brain structures associated with the release of several key neurotransmitters. As a standalone therapy, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) offers mild to moderate clinical benefit, often only after a 6-month latency, however in the past decade, VNS has seen a reemergence as a powerful neuromodulation tool. In the past decade, there has been a push in the development of VNS-paired therapies with animal promising therapeutic applications ranging from anti-inflammation, neuroprotection and recovery, obesity, and PTSD.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Obese subjects can be considered “food addicted”. Since there is growing evidence for the role of deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS) in reducing craving for different addictions, we proposed high frequency (HF) dTMS as a mean to reduce food craving and body weight. To identify regional location of dTMS stimulation we presently measured the regional brain network centrality (degree centrality, DC), in resting-state fMRI brain patterns, to explore plastic changes associated with HF dTMS in obese patients.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Obesity is characterized by dysfunctional dopamine-modulated circuits. Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS) is a non invasive technique inducing long lasting changes in neural excitability and dopamine release. Deep TMS is already used in the treatment of several neuropsychiatric disorders associated with abnormal dopamine release. Therefore, a potential role of dTMS in inducing satiety and body weight loss, through modulation of food craving circuits, was hypothesized.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Background: Although some studies have reported significant reductions in food cravings following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), none have examined changes in body weight.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Background: Obesity is associated with reduced activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), a brain region that supports key dopamine-related cognitive and reward processes relevant to eating behavior. Recent research has shown that increasing DLPFC excitability via transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can decrease appetite and body weight; however, variability in response across subjects is large. Here, we investigated whether COMT Val158Met polymorphism, a major determinant of prefrontal dopamine levels, influences tDCS effects on body weight and appetite in obesity.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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