Influenza activity in Kenya, 2007‐2013: timing, association with climatic factors, and implications for vaccination campaigns

Abstract BackgroundInformation on the timing of influenza circulation remains scarce in Tropical regions of Africa. ObjectivesWe assessed the relationship between influenza activity and several meteorological factors (temperature, specific humidity, precipitation), and characterized the timing of influenza circulation, and its implications to vaccination strategies in Kenya. MethodsWe analyzed virologically‐confirmed influenza data for outpatient influenza‐like illness (ILI), hospitalized for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI), and cases of severe pneumonia over the period 2007‐2013. Using logistic and negative binomial regression methods, we assessed the independent association between climatic variables (lagged up to 4 weeks) and influenza activity. ResultsThere were multiple influenza epidemics occurring each year and lasting a median duration of 2‐4 months. On average, there were two epidemics occurring each year in most of the regions in Kenya, with the first epidemic occurring between the months of February and March and the second one between July and November. Specific humidity was independently and negatively associated with influenza activity. Combinations of low temperature (
Source: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

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BackgroundInformation on the timing of influenza circulation remains scarce in Tropical regions of Africa. ObjectivesWe assessed the relationship between influenza activity and several meteorological factors (temperature, specific humidity, precipitation) and characterized the timing of influenza circulation and its implications to vaccination strategies in Kenya. MethodsWe analyzed virologically confirmed influenza data for outpatient influenza‐like illness (ILI), hospitalized for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI), and cases of severe pneumonia over the period 2007–2013. Using logistic and negative binomi...
Source: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
BackgroundInformation on the timing of influenza circulation remains scarce in Tropical regions of Africa. ObjectivesWe assessed the relationship between influenza activity and several meteorological factors (temperature, specific humidity, precipitation) and characterized the timing of influenza circulation and its implications to vaccination strategies in Kenya. MethodsWe analyzed virologically confirmed influenza data for outpatient influenza‐like illness (ILI), hospitalized for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI), and cases of severe pneumonia over the period 2007–2013. Using logistic and negative binomi...
Source: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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