Lonely people at greater risk of heart disease

Loneliness and social isolation can impact a person's health, causing problems ranging from high blood pressure and being overweight to cognitive decline and even an increased risk of dying at a young age.
Source: WDSU.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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By Emma Young We all know that too little sleep is bad for us. Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley sleep scientist and author of the best-selling Why We Sleep, has gone so far as to declare: “The shorter you sleep, the shorter your life.” However, some researchers fear that our concerns about not getting enough sleep are becoming overblown — and that, ironically, they could be making the problem worse. In this feature, we take a look at evidence that “too little” sleep isn’t always the disaster that it’s held up to be. It’s not always about a lack of sleep You’ll be fami...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Feature Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: There is an implicit assumption that early detection of hypertension through screening can reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality, but this assumption has not been tested in rigorous research studies. High-quality evidence from RCTs or programmatic evidence from NRCTs on the effectiveness and costs or harms of different screening strategies for hypertension (mass, targeted, or opportunistic) to reduce hypertension-related morbidity and mortality is lacking. PMID: 32378196 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
DiscussionThe results will be important for policymakers when making decisions between multiple possible alternative strategies to prevent CVD. Compared to results from existing multiple separate pairwise meta-analyses, this overarching synthesis of all relevant work will enhance decision-making. The findings will be crucial to inform evidence-based priorities and guidelines for policies and planning prevention strategies of CVD.Systematic review registrationPROSPEROCRD42019123940.
Source: Systematic Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
AbstractThirty years ago, chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity accounted for less than 45% of the global disease burden. Today, they are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide, having surpassed infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and malaria. We have understood for decades the roles of ‘classical’ risk factors including elevated LDL-cholesterol, hypertension, elevated blood glucose, and smoking in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. More recent research is continuing to define the contribution of other emerging factors to the risk of developing cardiovascular di...
Source: Internal and Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs
Authors: Akyuz A Abstract Coronary artery disease (CAD) can be obstructive or nonobstructive. Patients with nonobstructive and stable angina pectoris are usually women. Nonobstructive CAD is caused by endothelial dysfunction at the microvascular level, such as cardiac syndrome X and coronary slow flow syndrome. Even if coronary anatomy is nonobstructive, the presence of myocardial ischemia is a major determinant for the exercise program. CAD is a chronic inflammatory disease, and the progression of the disease can lead to a rapid change in the functional capacity of CAD patients. Exercise training is a major compon...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
The coronavirus pandemic has changed a lot about modern American life: how we work, socialize, and even how we eat. Dining out is a distant memory. But nutritionally, people weren’t exactly thriving in pre-pandemic America. “Before COVID-19 came along, it was increasingly clear that the diet quality and nutritional status of Americans was terrible,” says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. More than 40% of U.S. adults are obese. After years of declines, heart disease death rates are on the rise again. So are rates of obesity-linked canc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD After my posts on telemedicine were published recently, (this one on Manly Wellness before the pandemic and this one after it erupted, on A Country Doctor Writes, then reblogged on The Health Care Blog, KevinMD and many others), I have been asked about my views on telemedicine’s role in the future of primary care. Things have changed quickly, and a bit chaotically, and there is a lot of experimentation happening right now in practices I work or speak with. Before thinking about telemedicine in Primary Care, we need to agree on some sort of definition of...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice primary care Telehealth Telemedicine Source Type: blogs
Authors: Das UN Abstract Our own studies and those of others have shown that defects in essential fatty acid (EFA) metabolism occurs in age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, immune dysfunction and cancer. It has been noted that in all these disorders there could occur a defect in the activities of desaturases, cyclo-oxygenase (COX), and lipoxygenase (LOX) enzymes leading to a decrease in the formation of their long-chain products gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
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