Asthma prevention and management guideline (adult asthma).

ASTHMA PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT GUIDELINE (ADULT ASTHMA). Arerugi. 2016;65(2):97-103 Authors: Ohta K PMID: 27086954 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Allergology International - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Arerugi Source Type: research

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Publication date: April 2020Source: Journal of Adolescence, Volume 80Author(s): Samantha A. Miadich, Robin S. Everhart, Jessica Greenlee, Marcia A. Winter
Source: Journal of Adolescence - Category: Child Development Source Type: research
Acute severe asthma represents a common medical emergency, accounting for>65,000 UK hospital admissions each year, and asthma still accounts for approximately 1400 UK deaths annually. Risk factors for fatal asthma include poorly controlled disease, inappropriate medical management and adverse behavioural and social factors. Asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, resulting in periodic wheeze, cough and breathlessness. A variety of triggers, most commonly viral respiratory tract infections, can cause exacerbations.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Adult asthma Source Type: research
AbstractThrough the catalysis of α2,6-linked sialylation, the enzyme ST6Gal1 is thought to play key roles in immune cell communication and homeostasis. Of particular importance, glycans with terminal α2,6-sialic acids are known to negatively regulate B cell receptor signaling and are associated with an immunosuppressive tumor mic roenvironment that promotes T cell anergy, suggesting that α2,6-sialic acids are a key immune inhibitory signal. Consistent with this model, mice harboring a hepatocyte-specific ablation of ST6Gal1 (H-cKO) develop a progressive and severe non-alcoholic fatty liver disease charact...
Source: Glycoconjugate Journal - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
ConclusionOur results showed that there is no difference in the FEV1 and forced vital capacity betweenAspergillus positive and negative patients in any asthma severity group.
Source: The Clinical Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
If you ’re one of millions of Americans exposed to air pollution, you may be at a greater risk of catching the coronavirus — and of having a more severe infection.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Air Pollution Respiratory Diseases Asthma Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Global Warming Environment Source Type: news
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Until recently, chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) was viewed as a chronic infectious disease of the sinuses caused by anaerobic bacteria. This dogma led to the concept that, as with any abscess in a closed space, the primary modalities of treatment should be surgical drainage and antibiotics. Not surprisingly, few patients responded favorably. Recent years have seen a revolution in our thinking, with the recognition that CRS is a chronic inflammatory disease —a syndrome comprising numerous chronic inflammatory diseases.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
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