Sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing during pregnancy

This study aimed to examine if there is a difference in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and sleepiness between pregnant and non-pregnant women. It also aimed to evaluate if obstetric outcomes were associated to sleep-disordered breathing among the pregnant women. Methods One hundred pregnant women (gestational weeks 24–34) and 80 age- and body mass index-matched non-pregnant women underwent whole-night respiratory recordings (airflow, snoring, respiratory movements, body position, pulse oximetry). The women also answered a questionnaire including the Epworth sleepiness scale. Results Eighty-nine percent of the pregnant women had normal body mass index (BMI). Objectively, recorded snoring was more common among the pregnant women (median 9 % of total estimated sleep time) than among the controls (4 % of total sleep time, p = 0.005). Three of the pregnant women had OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI)>5), but in two cases, this was mainly due to central hypopneas. None had AHI>10. Two controls were diagnosed as OSA. Respiratory parameters including snoring showed no impact on obstetric outcomes. Total Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) score was higher among pregnant women than among controls (median 9 vs 7, p 
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

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Conclusions:Modeling neck circumference while allowing for differences by Mallampati class showed a nearly threefold increase in the risk of SDB with increasing neck circumference in women with Mallampati class 1. Other potential sites of airway obstruction need to be investigated in future research.Citation:Bourjeily G, Chambers A, Salameh M, Bublitz MH, Kaur A, Coppa A, Risica P, Lambert-Messerlian G. Anthropometric measures and prediction of maternal sleep-disordered breathing.J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(6):849–856.
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
We examined the validity of the STOP-Bang questionnaire and a modified STOP-Bang questionnaire to screen for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in women with obesity during the second trimester of pregnancy.Methods:Ninety-nine pregnant women age 18 years or older with body mass index≥ 40 kg/m2 completed the STOP-Bang questionnaire during their second trimester. The number of oxygen desaturation events (≥ 4% from baseline) was measured using overnight pulse oximetry, with OSA defined as≥ 5 events/h. A Modified STOP-Bang score was derived by replacing the“Tired” item with Epworth Sleepiness Scale score≥ 10...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in pregnancy can present as snoring and/or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and the prevalence is increasing due to the increase in maternal obesity. Pregnant women often present with fatigue and daytime sleepiness rather than the classic symptoms. Habitual snoring, older age, chronic hypertension, and high prepregnancy body mass index are reliable indicators of increased risk for SDB and should trigger further testing. The gold standard for diagnosis of OSA is an overnight laboratory polysomnography. Although there are no studies linking SDB to poor fetal outcomes, fetal well-being remains p...
Source: Sleep Medicine Clinics - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
The spectrum of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) ranges from mild snoring to obstructive sleep apnea, the most severe form of SDB. Current recommendations are to treat these women with continuous positive airway pressure despite limited data. SDB in early and mid-pregnancy is associated with preeclampsia and gestational diabetes. Pregnant women with a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea at delivery were at significantly increased risk of having cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, pulmonary embolism, and in-hospital death. These effects were exacerbated in the presence of obesity. Postpartum, these women are at risk ...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Snoring, older age and obesity may increase a pregnant woman ’s risk.
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - Category: American Health Source Type: news
When I began writing in this spot three years ago, the headline of my very first entry was, "Getting Enough Sleep Is Smart, Not Selfish." That post went up at a time when Americans were beginning to focus more on a good night's rest. The subject came into a sharper focus, in part, because wearable technology gave us some specifics. Forget the anecdotal evidence of whether we slept well; with the touch of a button, we could know what time we fell asleep, how long we were out and how often our sleep was interrupted. The study of sleep -- and conversations around it -- began gaining traction. Among those paying ke...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study aimed to examine if there is a difference in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and sleepiness between pregnant and non-pregnant women. It also aimed to evaluate if obstetric outcomes were associated to sleep-disordered breathing among the pregnant women. METHODS: One hundred pregnant women (gestational weeks 24-34) and 80 age- and body mass index-matched non-pregnant women underwent whole-night respiratory recordings (airflow, snoring, respiratory movements, body position, pulse oximetry). The women also answered a questionnaire including the Epworth sleepiness scale. RESULTS: Eighty-nine...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
Background: Women appear to be increasingly susceptible to snoring and sleep disorders breathing during pregnancy. However pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) are less likely to be assessed or to receive a diagnosis.Objective: the aim of this report was to evaluate the prevalence of common symptoms of OSAHS in pregnant women and secondarily to seek a link with Pregnancy-induced blood hypertension and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR).Method: An observational study of 120 pregnant women who responded to a predetermined questionnaire 24 hours after giving birth in a maternity.Results: t...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: 4.2 Sleep and Control of Breathing Source Type: research
Conclusion Despite some physiologic changes of pregnancy that impact ventilatory control, the prevalence of central sleep apnea was low in our sample of overweight pregnant women with sleep-disordered breathing.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Despite some physiologic changes of pregnancy that impact ventilatory control, the prevalence of central sleep apnea was low in our sample of overweight pregnant women with sleep-disordered breathing. PMID: 25566940 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
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