Madison’s story: Speaking up for autism

Madison Marilla had reached her breaking point. Starting at a new school after a cross-country move from California to Massachusetts isn’t easy for any eighth grader, but Madison wasn’t just any middle school student. She was diagnosed with autism at age 2. “No one understood my autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).” Madison says. “Kids would push me, steal my things, trip me in the hall, memorize my locker combination.” Madison started feeling very negative. After speaking with her mentor, she decided the kids in her class might be able to understand her better if they were more aware of her autism. Jess, Madison’s mentor, gave her courage and a voice. “She changed me forever. She was always there for me and she always supported me.” Becoming an autism advocate “I stood in front of my class, and I said, ‘I was diagnosed with autism in 1999.’ I said, ‘It’s OK to be different.’” Although Madison’s classmates got the message, she knew there was more work to do. She set up an autism awareness table at her middle school to spread the message that not only is it OK to be different — it’s a good thing. When she reached high school, the table transformed into an autism awareness club with more than 50 members. When Channel 7 got wind up of the club, Madison was featured in a Class Act profile. Madison&r...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Teen Health attention deficit hyperactivity disorder autism Department of Neurology Dr. Robert Wolff obsessive-compulsive disorder Source Type: news

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How old mothers and fathers are when their children are born may affect their children ’s risk of developing several neuropsychiatric disorders, according to astudy published this week in theJournal of the American Academy of Child&Adolescent Psychiatry.Magdalena Janecka, Ph.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, N.Y., and colleagues analyzed data from the medical and psychiatric records of nearly 1.5 million people in Denmark who were born between 1980 and 2007. They looked at rates of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OC...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD autism chronic tic disorder Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Magdalena Janecka OCD paternal age pediatric disorders Tourette ’s syndrome Source Type: research
Parental age at birth has been shown to affect the rates of a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, but the understanding of the mechanisms through which it mediates different outcomes is still lacking. We used a population-based cohort to assess differential effects of parental age on estimates of risk across pediatric-onset neuropsychiatric disorders: autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder (TS/CT).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: New Research Source Type: research
This study found associations between any treated infection and increased risks of all treated childhood and adolescent mental disorders, with the risks differing among specific mental disorders,” wrote Ole Köhler-Forsberg, M.D., of Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark and colleagues.For the study, K öhler-Forsberg and colleagues analyzed information contained in the Danish nationwide registers on more than one million children and adolescents born in Denmark between January 1, 1995, and June 30, 2012. The researchers focused their analysis on records of infections requiring hospitalizations an d less seve...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: anti-infective medications hospitalization infections JAMA Psychiatry Lena Brundin mental disorders Ole K öhler-Forsberg psychotropics Viviane Labrie Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 November 2018Source: Developmental Cognitive NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Bram Gooskens, Dienke J. Bos, Vincent T. Mensen, Devon A. Shook, Muriel Bruchhage, Jill Naaijen, Isabella Wolf, Daniel Brandeis, Steven C.R. Williams, Jan K. Buitelaar, Bob Oranje, Sarah Durston, the TACTICS consortiumAbstractRepetitive behaviors are among the core symptoms of both Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and are thought to be associated with impairments in cognitive control. However, it is still unknown how deficits in cognitive control and associated neural circuitry rel...
Source: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
A highly effective psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on how our thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes can affect our feelings and behavior. Traditional CBT treatment usually requires weekly 30- to 60-minute sessions over 12 to 20 weeks. A faster option now emerging is intensive CBT (I-CBT), which employs much longer sessions concentrated into a month, week, or weekend — or sometimes a single eight-hour session. CBT helps people learn tools to reframe different types of thinking, such as black-and-white thinking (I can’t do anything right) and emotional reasoning (I feel you dislike me, ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
, Eating Disorder Working Group of the PGC, Major Depressive Disorder Working Group of the PGC, Obsessive Compulsive Disorders and Tourette Syndrome Working Group of the PGC, Schizophrenia CLOZUK, Substance Use Disorder Working Group of the PGC, Agrawal A, Børglum AD, Bulik CM, Daly MJ, Davis LK, Demontis D, Edenberg HJ, Grove J, Gelernter J, Neale BM, Pardiñas AF, Stahl E, Walters JTR, Walters R, Sullivan PF, Posthuma D, Polderman TJC PMID: 30334498 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Psychological Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Psychol Med Source Type: research
We describe the neurodevelopmental needs in this young cohort at study enrollment as reported by the parent or primary care-giver. We present data that supports that young boys with DMD have a high prevalence of neurodevelopmental needs as reported by parent or care-giver. Further, boys with DMD mutations between exons 45-50 reported higher cognitive problems. There was no relationship between neurodevelopmental needs and glucocorticoid use. We conclude that there is an unmet, critical medical need in DMD to develop pragmatic solutions for early detection and intervention of neurodevelopmental needs during a window of neu...
Source: PLOS Currents Muscular Dystrophy - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
This article reviews the literature on the pharmacotherapy of psychiatric conditions co-occurring with DS, including major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), psychosis, and catatonia. A section on the phenomenon of regression is included. Expert opinion: For MDD, we typically begin with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). For bipolar disorder, we often use carbamazepine. For psychotic symptoms, we begin with risperidone or aripiprazole. We use buspirone to treat anx...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Given the unique character of each study design, the convergent findings for these eight psychiatric conditions suggest that heritability estimates are robust across different methods. The findings also highlight large differences in genetic and environmental influences between psychiatric disorders, providing future directions for etiological psychiatric research. PMID: 30221610 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Psychological Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Psychol Med Source Type: research
We can link grain consumption with causing or worsening some of the most mysterious brain disorders that have eluded the medical community for years, such as schizophrenia, epilepsy, depression, bipolar disorder, and, more recently, autism and ADHD. Are you and your kids unknowingly under the influence of opiates? Opiates come disguised in many forms.   Grains contain opiates. Not figuratively, but quite literally. These opiates are not too different from morphine or heroin. Yes, wheat and grains, cleverly disguised as a multigrain loaf of bread to make sandwiches or a hot, steamy plate of macaroni and cheese for the ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates adhd bipolar disorder brain fog concentration Depression diy health Dr. Davis epilepsy grain-free headaches Inflammation mind mood swings OCD opiates schizophrenia undoctored wheat belly Wheat Belly Tot Source Type: blogs
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