Antibiotic resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in various countries: A review.

This article reviewed the antibiotic resistance profile of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in the United States and other countries including Italy, Brazil, Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, China, India, Iran, South Africa and Australia. The awareness of antimicrobial resistance of these two pathogens is not as well documented as other foodborne bacterial pathogens. Vibrio spp. are usually susceptible to most antimicrobials of veterinary and human significance. However, many studies reported that V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus showed multiple-antibiotic resistance due to misuse of antibiotics to control infections in aquaculture production. In addition, both environmental and clinical isolates showed similar antibiotic resistance profiles. Most frequently observed antibiotic resistance profiles involved ampicillin, penicillin and tetracycline regardless of the countries. The presence of multiple-antibiotic resistant bacteria in seafood and aquatic environments is a major concern in fish and shellfish farming and human health. PMID: 27052711 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 18 September 2019Source: Drug Discovery Today: Disease ModelsAuthor(s): Allan Artavia-León, Miguel Pacheco-Leiva, Cristofer Moya-Román, Natalia Rodríguez-Hernández, Adrián A. Pinto-TomásAnts have been widely studied, with 14,000 described species, but it is not until recently that they gained attention as sources for antimicrobial drug discovery. An increasing amount of studies are investigating ant-microbe symbioses, and clear benefits from their microbial counterparts have been experimentally demonstrated for ants in the tribes Attini, Camponoti...
Source: Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Chemico-Biological Interactions - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Chem Biol Interact Source Type: research
Abstract Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus changes to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) upon the acquisition of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), a genomic island that encodes methicillin resistance. SCCmec elements in S. aureus are classified into different types based on the combination of mec gene complexes and ccr gene complexes, which share variations, five classes in mec and eight in ccr. To date, at least 13 types of SCCmec elements have been identified and each SCCmec type has individual characteristics. It is known that hospital-associated MRSA strains carry SCCmec elements of types, I...
Source: Molecular Medicine - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research
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Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Health Childbirth Science Immunology Asthma & wellbeing Medical research Society Children Source Type: news
Abstract One of the foremost challenges of drug discovery in any therapeutic area is that of solidifying the correlation between in vitro activity and clinical efficacy. Between these is the confirmation that affecting a particular target in vivo will lead to a therapeutic benefit. In antibacterial drug discovery, there is a key advantage from the start, since the targets are bacteria-therefore, it is simple to ascertain in vitro whether a drug has the desired effect, i.e., bacterial cell inhibition or killing, and to understand the mechanism by which that occurs. The downstream criteria, whether a compound reache...
Source: Mol Biol Cell - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research
Abstract One of the largest concerns in public health is the continual emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens. The resistance of bacterial pathogens to specific drugs presents a significant problem because it severely limits treatment options. Staphylococcus aureus is a particularly problematic pathogen that is prevalent in human and animal populations. Data on this bacterium have shown that S. aureus is capable of invading different types of host cells, suggesting that multiple mechanisms are behind its ability to thwart a host immune system and evade the toxicity of some antibiotics. S. aureus prod...
Source: Mol Biol Cell - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
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Source: Food Control - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
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