Misidentification of Brucella suis as Ochrobactrum anthropi in a Patient with Septic Arthritis

We report a case of a 24-year-old resident of North Queensland who presented to our facility with a native joint septic arthritis. A bacterial isolate recovered from an initial joint aspirate culture was misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi using an automated identification system. A subsequent specimen grew an isolate that was identified as Brucella sp. by the same automated system, with a single biochemical reaction (adonitol) differentiating the identities of the two organisms. Subsequent real-time PCR testing of the IS711 element of the Brucella genome confirmed both isolates as Brucella suis.
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Meta GeneAuthor(s): Mansour Zamanpoor, Hamid Ghaedi, Mir Davood Omrani
Source: Meta Gene - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Fernando Lopes, Fernando A. Vicentini, Nina L. Cluny, Alexander J. Mathews, Benjamin H. Lee, Wagdi A. Almishri, Lateece Griffin, William Gonçalves, Vanessa Pinho, Derek M. McKay, Simon A. Hirota, Mark G. Swain, Quentin J. Pittman, Keith A. Sharkey
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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
We present a case of a rare manifestation of brucellosis i.e., septic arthritis of the knee joint associated with a lytic lesion of the proximal tibia. The patient belonged to a Brucella endemic country, and clinical features were of chronic reactive knee arthritis with synovial hypertrophy and effusion. Advanced diagnostic methods played a pivotal role in excluding the diagnosis of tuberculosis, and thus unnecessary administration of antitubercular therapy and initiating focused narrowed anti-Brucella management, achieving the goal of antimicrobial stewardship also.
Source: Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Gupta N, Chaudhry R, Soneja M, Valappil VE, Malla S, Razik A, Vyas S, Ray A, Khan MA, Kumar U, Wig N Abstract Oligoarticular arthritis (inflammation of upto 4 joints) has a wide range of infectious and non-infectious etiologies. The aim of our study was to identify the features which could help in the differentiation of infectious from non-infectious arthritis. The study was prospective and observational, and included 100 patients with oligoarticular inflammatory arthritis. The final diagnosis was made using standard diagnostic criteria and the patients were categorized into infectious and non-infectious g...
Source: Drug Discoveries and Therapeutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drug Discov Ther Source Type: research
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Source: World Journal of Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: World J Orthop Source Type: research
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Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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