We Shouldn’t Be Surprised When NFL Players Retire Early Anymore

The NFL's "concussion crisis" has taken its next logical step: the "retirement crisis." On Friday, New York Jets offensive tackle and former Pro Bowler D'Brickashaw Ferguson announced his decision to retire from the NFL at 32 years old. Unlike some players who are forced to hang up their cleats after clinging to every last bit of turf in the hopes of scoring another contract but eventually retire because of debilitating body injuries, Ferguson -- like around a dozen other NFL players over the past two years -- has retired early without any outstanding injury or body-related issues.  Ferguson was a model of durability, playing 10 seasons and never missing a single practice or appearing on the injury report. He started 167 consecutive games with over 10,000 career snaps, only missing one snap as part of a trick play. Without question, Ferguson could've kept on playing the game he loves for millions of guaranteed dollars.  Filed to ESPN: Jets LT D'Brickashaw Ferguson is retiring today after 10 seasons, per sources. Only 32. Completely healthy. A stunner. #nyj— Rich Cimini (@RichCimini) April 8, 2016 Ferguson's retirement is hardly stunning though. It's not even worth batting an eye over. In an age of heightened awareness about football and its potentially deadly effects on the brain -- 87 out of 91 former NFL players tested positive in September 2015 for the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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ConclusionLET is a rare cutaneous lupus-specific lesion that may be associated with SLE. AITD, hypothyroidism in particular, could be an initial presentation of SLE. Increased awareness and early diagnosis of such clinical presentations may improve patient outcomes.
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Do children of depressed parents exhibit greater parent- and self-reported sleep disturbance compared to those without any parental psychopathology?Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry Journal Article Source Type: news
CNN) — After examining the brains of former professional football players, researchers might be a step closer to diagnosing the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the living, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers utilized PET imaging to find tau, an abnormal protein that’s a signature indicator of CTE, using a radioactive drug or tracer called flortaucipir. The researchers imaged the brains of 26 living former football players and compared them with the brains of 31 people with no history of traumatic brain injury. (WBZ-TV) Th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN CTE Source Type: news
From the desk of Jerome Gronli, MDJerome Gronli,  MDSports participation offers many tremendous benefits for children and adolescents. Regular participation in sports can help maintain and improve physical health, has important cognitive and emotional benefits, and provides wonderful opportunities for building friendships and camaraderie. At the same time, families sometimes have questions about issues related to sports participation. In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the significance of concussions and repeated head trauma, including the risk of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE),...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Healthy Habits Source Type: news
Actor Will Smith had expected the 2015 film “Concussion,” in which he plays a pathologist who exposes the truth about traumatic brain injuries in National Football League players, would lead to serious change in the sport.  Instead, alarming scientific research that the movie highlighted went largely overlooked, which Smith said came as a surprise, he told Vanity Fair.  “I thought ‘Concussion’ would have a bigger impact,” Smith told the magazine. “I knew it would be hard because people love the game, but the science is so overwhelming, and it’s someth...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Adrian Robinson Jr., a professional football player who died by suicide earlier this year, had a brain disease, his autopsy recently revealed. The same disorder has also been found in others who have sustained repeated blows to the head. Robinson, who played for several football teams, including the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Pittsburgh Steelers, died on May 16. During his two years in the National Football League (NFL), he suffered several concussions. Now, an autopsy revealed that he had signs of a chronic brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).  "He went from being one of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study was supported by grants from the NIH (P01-AG025831 and M01-RR00865) and gifts to UCLA from the Toulmin Foundation and Robert and Marion Wilson. No company provided research funding for this study. The FDDNP marker used with brain PET scans to identify abnormal proteins is intellectual property owned by UCLA and licensed to TauMark, LLC. UCLA authors Dr. Jorge Barrio, Dr. Gary Small and Dr. Sung-Cheng Huang are co-inventors of the PET marker. Barrio and Small have a financial interest in the company. Other disclosures are available in the manuscript.
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Is brain damage an inevitable consequence of American football, an avoidable risk of it, or neither? An editorial published yesterday in the medical journal BMJ poses those provocative questions. Chad Asplund, director of sports medicine at Georgia Regents University, and Thomas Best, professor and chair of sports medicine at Ohio State University, offer an overview of the unresolved connection between playing football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a type of gradually worsening brain damage caused by repeated mild brain injuries or concussions. This condition was first described in a football player in 2005, after ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Anxiety and Depression Medical Research Memory Men's Health Mental Health Safety brain damage brain health chronic traumatic encephalopathy concussion football National Football League Source Type: news
By: Rachael Rettner Published: 03/18/2015 10:51 AM EDT The up-and-coming professional football player Chris Borland, of the San Francisco 49ers, is now leaving the sport out of concern that a career in football would increase his risk of brain disease. But what types of neurological problems have been linked with football, and how might these arise? On Monday (March 16), Borland announced he was retiring from football after studying the link between football head injuries and degenerative brain disease, and discussing his decision with friends, family members, concussion researchers and teammates, according to ESPN. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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