The evolving role of immunotherapy in prostate cancer

Purpose of review: In recent clinical trials, immunotherapeutic agents have demonstrated promising results for the treatment of prostate cancer. This review discusses emerging immunotherapies for prostate cancer and their evolving role in sequencing and combination therapy. Recent findings: Therapeutic vaccines including PROSTVAC and DCVAC/PCa have completed promising phase 2 trials for the treatment of prostate cancer and phase 3 trials are underway. Recent evidence supports a synergistic relationship between immunotherapy agents themselves, antiandrogens and with cytotoxic chemotherapy. Prostate cancer patients with good prognostic factors, such as minimal disease burden, appear to achieve the optimal benefit from immunotherapy. Summary: Therapeutic cancer vaccines and immunomodulating agents have demonstrated activity in the treatment of prostate cancer. Immunotherapies may alter the prostate tumor microenvironment and ongoing studies aim to provide guidance on effective sequencing and combination strategies.
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: GENITOURINARY SYSTEM: Edited by Arif Hussain Source Type: research

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Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer in men, and the second leading cause of cancer related death in men in Western countries. The standard therapy for metastatic PCa is androgen suppression therapy (AST). Men undergoing AST eventually develop metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), of which there are limited treatment options available. Immunotherapy has presented substantial benefits for many types of cancer, but only a marginal benefit for mCRPC, at least in part, due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME). Current clinical trials are investigating monotherapies or combination ...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Clara Degos1, Mellie Heinemann2, Julien Barrou2, Nicolas Boucherit1, Eric Lambaudie2, Ariel Savina3†, Laurent Gorvel1* and Daniel Olive1* 1Tumor Immunology Team, IBISA Immunomonitoring Platform, Cancer Research Center of Marseillle, INSERM U1068, CNRS U7258, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France 2Department of Surgical Oncology 2, CNRS, INSERM, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, CRCM, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France 3Institut Roche, Boulogne Billancourt, France Endometrial Cancer is the most common cancer in the female genital tract in developed countries, and with its ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In this study, the immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that DEPDC1 was high-expressed in breast cancer tissues compared with the paired adjacent normal breast tissues, and its tendency at protein level was consistent with mRNA level from TCGA data. Moreover, DEPDC1 mRNA level revealed the strongest association with poor prognosis and development in breast cancer. In vitro assays showed that DEPDC1 overexpression resulted in significant promotion of proliferation by regulating cell cycle in MCF-7 cells, whilst an opposite effect was found in the MDA-MB-231 cells with DEPDC1 deletion. Notably, further investigation ind...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Personalized Dendritic Cell Vaccines—Recent Breakthroughs and Encouraging Clinical Results Beatris Mastelic-Gavillet, Klara Balint, Caroline Boudousquie, Philippe O. Gannon and Lana E. Kandalaft* Department of Oncology, Center for Experimental Therapeutics, Ludwig Center for Cancer Research, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland With the advent of combined immunotherapies, personalized dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination could integrate the current standard of care for the treatment of a large variety of tumors. Due to their proficiency at antigen presentation, DC are key coordinators of the innate...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study was supported in part by the National Cancer Center Research and Development Fund (25-A-7 and 28-A-8); Health and Labor Science Research Grants for Clinical Research, Japan; and joint research funding from Takeda Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.; Noile-Immune Biotech Inc.; Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.; BrightPath Biotherapeutics Co., Ltd.; and Sysmex Co., Ltd. This study was performed as part of a research program of the Project for Development of Innovative Research on Cancer Therapeutics (P-Direct), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. Conflict of Interest Statement TN, TS, and TY ...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Authors: Pan RY, Chung WH, Chu MT, Chen SJ, Chen HC, Zheng L, Hung SI Abstract Recently, increasing data show that immunotherapy could be a powerful weapon against cancers. Comparing to the traditional surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immunotherapy more specifically targets cancer cells, giving rise to the opportunities to the patients to have higher response rates and better quality of life and even to cure the disease. Cancer vaccines could be designed to target tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), cancer germline antigens, virus-associated antigens, or tumor-specific antigens (TSAs), which are also called neo...
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
Mesothelioma patients showed an impressive immune response to TroVax, a novel cancer vaccine, when it was combined with standard chemotherapy in a recent clinical trial. Researchers from Cardiff University in the United Kingdom conducted the study that was published by the journal OncoImmunology. TroVax is a laboratory engineered virus designed to target the human protein 5T4. A mutated form of 5T4 is found in almost all mesothelioma tumors, including the sarcomatoid subtype, the most difficult to treat. The phase II clinical trial produced a disease control rate of 87 percent, more than double the rate of a previous stud...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Oncologists in Spain are recruiting patients for the randomized phase of the pleural mesothelioma clinical trial involving ONCOS-102, the promising immunotherapy vaccine. Optimism surrounding the trial stems from encouraging results obtained recently in the six-patient safety cohort used as a precautionary lead-in. The trial involves the vaccine in combination with standard-of-care chemotherapy for patients with inoperable disease. ONCOS-102 is a scientifically engineered adenovirus that is designed to activate a patient’s immune system to selectively target cancer cells. It is being developed by Targovax, a Scandina...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Hyperthermic treatment at 56 °C induces tumour-specific immune protection in a mouse model of prostate cancer in both prophylactic and therapeutic immunization regimens. Vaccine. 2018 May 08;: Authors: De Sanctis F, Sandri S, Martini M, Mazzocco M, Fiore A, Trovato R, Garetto S, Brusa D, Ugel S, Sartoris S Abstract Most active cancer immunotherapies able to induce a long-lasting protection against tumours are based on the activation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Cell death by hyperthermia induces apoptosis followed by secondary necrosis, with the production of factors named ...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
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