New insights in cancer therapy from cell death research

Researchers in the group of Prof. Dr. Peter Vandenabeele (VIB/UGent) show that killed tumour cells can serve as a potent vaccine that stimulates the immune system to prevent the outgrowth of cancer cells. This finding opens novel perspectives for the use of necroptosis as a part of immunotherapy and for the screening for novel or existing cancer drugs that induce this type of immunogenic cell death.
Source: World Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

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As immunotherapies continue to emerge as a standard component of treatment for a variety of cancers, the imperative for testing these in combination with other standard cancer therapies grows. Radiation therapy may be a particularly well-suited partner for many immunotherapies. By modulating immune tolerance and functional immunogenicity at a targeted tumor site, radiation therapy may serve as a method of in situ tumor vaccination. In situ tumor vaccination is a therapeutic strategy that seeks to convert a patient's own tumor into a nidus for enhanced presentation of tumor-specific antigens in a way that will stimulate and...
Source: Brachytherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Authors: Oliveres H, Caglevic C, Passiglia F, Taverna S, Smits E, Rolfo C Abstract Despite new advances in therapeutics, lung cancer remains the first cause of mortality among different types of malignancies. To improve survival, different strategies have been developed such as chemotherapy combinations, targeted therapies and more recently immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is based on the capability of the immune system to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells to fight against the tumor. The two main checkpoint inhibitors that have been widely studied in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA...
Source: Journal of Thoracic Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Thorac Dis Source Type: research
In the past decades, our knowledge about the relationship between cancer and the immune system has increased considerably. Recent years' success of cancer immunotherapy including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), cancer vaccines, adoptive cancer therapy and the immune checkpoint therapy has revolutionized traditional cancer treatment. However, challenges still exist in this field. Personalized combination therapies via new techniques will be the next promising strategies for the future cancer treatment direction.
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Immune-based therapy has emerged as a paradigm shift in cancer therapy with dramatic responses observed in previously incurable disease. Cancer vaccines are being developed to disrupt tumor-associated tolerance and activate and selectively expand tumor-specific lymphocytes within the native effector cell repertoire while maintaining immune-regulatory protection against autoimmunity. Although individual antigen approaches result in immune response with a suggestion of clinical effect in some settings, broader efficacy may be dependent on presentation of multiple antigens that capture clonal diversity presented in the contex...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Immunobiology and Immunotherapy, Review Articles, Review Series, Clinical Trials and Observations Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: ICOS/ICOS-L signal pathway has the potential to improve cancer treatment. However, studies in other models are needed to understand whether inhibition of ICOS expression or the blockage of its co-stimulation could be a potential therapeutic target or adjuvant treatment for immunotherapy. PMID: 29879883 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Protein and Peptide Science - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Curr Protein Pept Sci Source Type: research
In conclusion, EM-L2 displaying phage particles could be deemed as an encouraging strategy in contemporary cancer immunotherapy. PMID: 29908541 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Iranian Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018 Source:Molecular Immunology, Volume 98 Author(s): David Urbanavicius, Tara Alvarez, Georgina K. Such, Angus P.R. Johnston, Justine D. Mintern A complex and multifaceted relationship exists between cancer and the immune system. Advances in our understanding of this relationship have resulted in significant clinical attention in the possibilities of cancer immunotherapy. Harnessing the immune system’s potent and selective destructive capability is a major focus of attempts to treat cancer. Despite significant progress in the field, cancer therapy still remains significantly deficient, with ...
Source: Molecular Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In the advent of Immune Checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) and of CAR-T adoptive T-cells, the new frontier in Oncology is Cancer Immunotherapy because of its ability to provide long term clinical benefit in metastati...
Source: Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
li CA Abstract In recent years, cell-based therapies targeting the immune system have emerged as promising strategies for cancer treatment. This review summarizes manufacturing challenges related to production of antigen presenting cells as a patient-tailored cancer therapy. Understanding cell-material interactions is essential because in vitro cell culture manipulations to obtain mature antigen-producing cells can significantly alter their in vivo performance. Traditional antigen-producing cell culture protocols often rely on cell adhesion to surface-treated hydrophilic polystyrene flasks. More recent commercial ...
Source: Transfusion - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Transfusion Source Type: research
Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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