Spring health cheat sheet

The beginning of spring often brings warm weather and hours of outdoor fun, and many common winter infections recede. Unfortunately, spring weather can bring its own health challenges. As soon as the trees and flowers bloom, flowers bud and the grass grows, susceptible children will start to display symptoms of seasonal allergies. Seasonal allergies cause sneezing, runny nose and itchy red eyes and can trigger flares of asthma and eczema. As children spend more time outdoors, parents also need to watch for exposure to ticks, poison ivy and excess sun. Read on for the parents’ guide to spring health. Seasonal allergies: symptoms to look for Allergic rhinitis About one in five children develops seasonal allergy symptoms. In New England, tree pollen begins affecting susceptible individuals as early as late March. Symptoms include: runny and itchy nose with watery discharge sneezing allergic shiners: dark circles under the eyes nasal salute: upward rubbing of the itchy nose, creating a characteristic crease Allergic conjunctivitis Some children with spring allergies will be bothered most by eye irritation. While some kids have just mild eye allergies, others have severe itching and discomfort. Children with allergic conjunctivitis have eye: It’s much easier to prevent allergy symptoms than to relieve them once they’ve appeared. redness itching burning watery or mucousy discharge Allergic asthma Pollens are a common asthma trigger for susceptible children. M...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Health & Wellness Parenting allergies asthma Carolyn Sax conjunctivitis lyme disease poion ivy sunburn Source Type: news

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Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In the article “New treatments for chronic urticaria” by P Kolkhir et al (Ann Allergy Asthma Immunl 2020:124(1): 2-12), the following text has been removed. The article has been corrected online at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2019.08.014.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Technology is one of those items with which all clinicians (probably everyone) seem to have a love-hate relationship. The electronic medical record has made documenting and billing patient encounters much easier, yet at the same time, it seems to have erected a barrier between the patient and provider. Along with the growth of the electronic health record has been an explosion in the use of handheld devices and health-related applications (apps). These apps allow for more engagement and involvement with patients, including health monitoring by providers.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
We thank the respondents to our article1 for their insightful comments. Although we have matched subjects in both cohorts by age, sex, comorbidities, and index date, Lin et  al2 indicate a lack of adjustment for co-medication status, including the use of corticosteroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), in the propensity score. We agree that these medications are important confounders on fracture. We therefore had conducted multivariate analysis in t he published article by adjustment for corticosteroids, DMARDs, and phototherapy.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
We read with great interest the article by Lin et  al1 reporting the association of incidental fractures in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). We appreciate the authors who collected data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database and conducted a great cohort study. Nevertheless, we highlight some key points.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeGenetic variants may influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PKPD) of cyclophosphamide (CY). CY plays a critical role in conditioning chemotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but its use is limited by toxicity. We explored the effect of genetic variants, potentially affecting PKPD of CY, and outcomes after HCT.MethodsThis observational pharmacogenomic study included 85 adults with hematologic malignancies who received reduced intensity conditioning with CY, fludarabine, and total body irradiation. We collected recipient DNA prior to HCT and evaluated 97 candidate variants in 66...
Source: Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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