This Disease Can Still Get You Quarantined For Months -- And It's On The Rise

In August 2014, Kate O’Brien, a 34-year-old media producer from Brooklyn, found out she was expecting her second child. She was ecstatic. But this pregnancy didn't proceed like the first. For the next few months, O'Brien had a cold she couldn't shake. She woke up in the middle of the night drenched in sweat. She wanted to blame it on her pregnancy, yet she kept losing weight. She could barely eat. She coughed up balls of bloody mucus. Her throat burned. None of her doctors could figure out what was wrong. A physician sent her to Mount Sinai West Hospital in Manhattan in January 2015, when, at five months pregnant, she still couldn't gain any weight. "No one likes a skinny pregnant lady," she said. O'Brien expected to stay at the hospital overnight. She didn’t get a chance to say goodbye to her 2-year-old, Donny, but she figured she'd be home soon. She didn't walk out of the hospital for 75 days. @media (max-width: 499px) { .desktop { display: none; } } @media (min-width: 500px) { .mobile { display: none; } } The doctors at Mount Sinai diagnosed O'Brien with infectious tuberculosis. After a few days in the intensive care unit, she was shifted to a negative-pressure isolation room, which helps contain the infected air. Signs announcing "WARNING: Infectious Disease" were affixed to the room's airtight set of double doors. And all O'Brien could think about was what this meant for her unborn baby. The federal policy that governs medical isol...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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One of the fundamental distinctions we need to make when working with people who experience pain is to understand the difference between experiencing pain – and the behaviour or actions or responses we make to this experience. This is crucial because we can never know “what it is like” to experience pain – and all we have to rely on as external observers is what we see the person doing. Differentiating between the various dimensions associated with our experience of pain makes it far easier to address each part in the distinct ways needed. Let me explain. We know the current definition of pain &ndas...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Clinical reasoning Cognitive skills Education/CME Pain Pain conditions biopsychosocial disability Research theory Source Type: blogs
Journal Name: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) Issue: Ahead of print
Source: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) important in vascular medicine as well as obstetrics. In obstetrics, it is important because it can cause fetal loss, intrauterine growth retardation and severe preeclampsia. In vascular medicine it is important because it can cause thrombotic events which could be arterial, venous or microvascular [1]. It can also be accompanied by moderate thrombocytopenia [2]. Thrombotic events involving multiple organs may be termed catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome [3]. APS is an autoimmune disease with antibodies directed against beta2 glycoprotein I. This leads to suppression of tissue fact...
Source: Cardiophile MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: General Cardiology anti beta2 glycoprotein I antibodies anti cardiolipin antibodies lupus anticoagulant Source Type: blogs
Depression affects one in five people each year. → Enjoying these psych studies? Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month (includes ad-free experience and more articles). → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: NEW: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Source Type: blogs
It is needless to say that heart disease in pregnancy is a challenge for the obstetrician and the cardiologist. Hemodynamic changes in pregnancy and labour can adversely affect many of the significant cardiac lesions. Increase in blood volume and heart rate are the important factors during pregnancy. In general stenotic lesions and pulmonary hypertension are poorly tolerated, while regurgitant lesions are better tolerated. Specific risks like aortic dissection and rupture are there for coarctation of aorta. Several risk stratification schemes have been developed for assessing the risk of pregnancy with heart disease over ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: General Cardiology CARPREG II risk scoring CARPREG risk stratification mWHO classification ZAHARA risk score Source Type: blogs
Source: NanoFocus - Category: Nanotechnology Authors: Source Type: research
ARTHRITIS symptoms consist of joint stiffness, pain and swelling, among others. Types of the condition include rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis. You ’re more likely to develop the condition if you’re older, overweight or have a previous injury. This joint exercise can help treat the symptoms.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The TWiVerati follow up on the Ebola virus outbreak, virulence of Ebola-Makona, and reveal how a parasitoid is revealed to hyperparasitoids, and binding of influenza virus to a calcium ion channel to mediate influenza virus entry. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, and Kathy Spindler Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASM Microbe 2018 Support Viruses &Cells Gordon Conference Faculty positions at Icahn School of Medicine International dsRNA Virus Symposium Tracing Ebola virus contacts(CIDRAP) WHO FAQ Ebola virus vaccine(WHO) Nipah virusoutbreak (CIDRAP) Revealingparasitoid t...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
This study aimed to investigate trends in mastectomy and breast reconstruction over the past 10 years and to evaluate the impact of NHIS coverage on breast reconstruction. METHODS: Nationwide data regarding mastectomy and breast reconstruction were collected from the Korean Breast Cancer Society registry database. Multiple variables were analyzed in the records of patients who underwent breast reconstruction from January 2005 to March 2017 at a single institution. RESULTS: At Seoul National University Hospital, the total number of reconstruction cases increased 13-fold from 2005 to 2016. The proportion of immediate...
Source: Archives of Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Arch Plast Surg Source Type: research
Authors: Kwak MD, Machens HG Abstract Chronic lymphedema is caused by an impairment of the lymphatic system due to primary or secondary causes. Vascularized lymph node transplantation (VLNT) is currently the most promising and frequently used technique besides lymphaticovenous anastomosis. However, the vessel anatomy in the lateral thoracic region is sometimes quite variable. Based on our experiences with vascular anatomical inconstancy in the lateral thoracic region, we planned a lateral intercostal artery perforator flap for VLNT in a female patient with chronic stage II lymphedema of both legs after cervical can...
Source: Archives of Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Arch Plast Surg Source Type: research
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