Low Infertility Risk in Female Childhood Cancer SurvivorsLow Infertility Risk in Female Childhood Cancer Survivors

The impact of modern chemotherapy regimens on fertility appears to be low in female childhood cancer survivors, but the effect on fertility is higher for men. Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

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Publication date: April 2018Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &Gynaecology, Volume 48Author(s): Gabriela N. Algarroba, Joseph S. Sanfilippo, Hanna Valli-PulaskiAbstractThe 5-year survival rate for childhood cancer is over 80%, thereby increasing the number of young women facing infertility in the future because of the gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiation. The gonadotoxic effects of childhood cancer treatment vary by the radiation regimen and the chemotherapeutic drugs utilized. Although the American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines recommend fertility preservation for all patie...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
AbstractAdult survivors of childhood cancers are more prone to developing poor reproductive and obstetrical outcomes than their siblings and the general population as a result of previous exposure to chemotherapy and radiation during childhood. Chemotherapy drugs exert cytotoxic effects systemically and therefore can damage the ovaries, leading to infertility, premature ovarian failure, and, to a lesser extent, spontaneous abortions. They have very limited or no deleterious effects on the uterus that can be recognized clinically. By contrast, radiation is detrimental to both the ovaries and the uterus, thereby causing a gr...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review, Gynecologic Oncology Source Type: research
UCLA researchers have made new inroads into understanding germ cell tumors, a diverse and rare group of cancers that begin in germ cells — the cells that develop into sperm and eggs. The researchers developed a protocol to recreate germ cell tumor cells from stem cells and used the new model to study the genetics of the cancer.Their findings could point the way toward new drugs to treat germ cell tumors, which account for around 3 percent of all cases of childhood and adolescent cancer.The study, published in Stem Cell Research, was led by Amander Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Abstract Adult survivors of childhood cancers are more prone to developing poor reproductive and obstetrical outcomes than their siblings and the general population as a result of previous exposure to chemotherapy and radiation during childhood. Chemotherapy drugs exert cytotoxic effects systemically and therefore can damage the ovaries, leading to infertility, premature ovarian failure, and, to a lesser extent, spontaneous abortions. They have very limited or no deleterious effects on the uterus that can be recognized clinically. By contrast, radiation is detrimental to both the ovaries and the uterus, thereby ca...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Oncologist Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 October 2017 Source:Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology Author(s): Gabriela N. Algarroba, Joseph S. Sanfilippo, Hanna Valli-Pulaski The 5-year survival rate for childhood cancer is over 80%, thereby increasing the number of young women facing infertility in the future due to the gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiation. The gonadotoxic effects of childhood cancer treatment vary by the radiation regimen and the chemotherapeutic drugs utilized. Although the American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines recommend fertility preservation for all p...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
STUDY QUESTION Is there an association between the need for medical puberty induction and the diagnosis or treatment received in girls who have undergone cryopreservation of ovarian tissue for fertility preservation? SUMMARY ANSWER There was a clear association between the intensity of treatment received and requirement for medical puberty induction but no association with the diagnosis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Although it cannot be predicted which girls will become infertile or develop premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) following intensive chemotherapy or irradiation, patients who are at high risk of POI should be offe...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Puberty, ageing and HRT Source Type: research
WebMD wasn't a research option when Ivy Brown was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1974, so her mother looked up her 12-year-old daughter's condition the old-fashioned way, in a hardcover medical volume. "It just said 'fatal,'" Brown explained. Having moved the family to London a month earlier, Brown's parents were still trying to liaise with her pediatrician in the U.S. "My father told me recently that he was sleeping with the phone on his stomach because of the time change," she said. "They were as scared as you can be when you have a child who you think you might lose," Brown explained....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: There are clear differences between pre-puberty and puberty patients. The frequency with which some method of fertility preservation is performed in patients is low. All respondents believe that the existence of national guidelines on the matter would be of interest. PMID: 27255351 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Anales de Pediatria - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: An Pediatr (Barc) Source Type: research
By Stacy Simon RESOURCES: Preserving fertility in boys and teens with cancerPreserving fertility in girls and teens with cancer A study by researchers from leading cancer centers across the US has found that modern chemotherapy treatments have only a small impact on the ability of female childhood and adolescent cancer survivors to have children when they grow up. However, male survivors are more likely to have fertility problems. An estimated 400,000 survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer are living in the US today. However, therapies to treat their cancer can affect their reproductive health when they become ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer in Adolescents Childhood Cancer Source Type: news
But same may not be as true for male survivors Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cancer Chemotherapy, Cancer in Children, Infertility
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Chemotherapy | Childhood Cancer | Hematology | Infertility | Reproduction Medicine