Did You Know Sperm Can Be Developed in a Lab? It's Possible

In a development that may someday help men facing infertility, Chinese scientists have just announced they were able to create sperm in a lab petri dish using embryonic stem cells from mice. The sperm was used to fertilize mouse eggs using in vitro fertilization (IVF), creating healthy babies that went on to have their own offspring. That's promising. Embryonic stem cells can actually develop into any type of cell in the body and have previously been used to create sperm. However, in the past, transforming such cells into sperm required the cells to be transplanted into the testicles of mice. The new technique represents an advance as the sperm was able to develop in a lab dish containing testicle cells. According to study results in the journal Cell Stem Cell, mouse sperm was used to fertilize mouse eggs and of 379 eggs injected, nine babies resulted. After 15 months, all mice appear healthy, and they're having their own offspring. While the sperm developed in the lab is a primitive type, not fully mature, known as spermatids, they still contained their full genetic component and were sufficient to fertilize eggs. Spermatids have been used to create healthy human babies in Japan, while some countries have outlawed the procedure. A number of scientists interviewed about the study results expressed excitement for how the work -- making sperm outside the body -- could aid research into basic sperm development and eventually help infertile men. Some Japanese research...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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There is nothing more frustrating than when the cure is part of the problem. Because depression is prevalent in patients with physical disorders like cancer, stroke, and heart disease, medications often interact with each other, complicating treatment. To appropriately manage depression, you and your physician need to evaluate all medications involved and make sure they aren’t cancelling each other out. A review in the journal Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience a while back highlighted certain medications that can cause depression. The following are medications to watch out for. Medications to Treat Seizures and Park...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Medications Drug Interactions Mood Disorder Source Type: blogs
(Abstracted from Hum Reprod 2018;33:2249–2255) Cytotoxic cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, cause damage to spermatogenic stem cells (SSCs), jeopardizing the fertility of young men of reproductive age. One potential method for future production of sperm in this population is SSC transplantation.
Source: Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey - Category: OBGYN Tags: GYNECOLOGY: INFERTILITY/REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES Source Type: research
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news
Stem cells survive oncotherapy &can regenerate non-functional gonads: A paradigm shift for oncofertility. Indian J Med Res. 2018 Dec;148(Supplement):S38-S49 Authors: Bhartiya D Abstract A large proportion of patients who survive cancer are rendered infertile as an unwanted side effect of oncotherapy. Currently accepted approaches for fertility preservation involve banking eggs/sperm/embryos or ovarian/testicular tissue before oncotherapy for future use. Such approaches are invasive, expensive, technically challenging and depend on assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Establishing a gonadal ti...
Source: The Indian Journal of Medical Research - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Indian J Med Res Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 3 November 2018Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Endocrinology &MetabolismAuthor(s): Marc Kanbar, Francesca di Michele, Christine WynsAbstractTransplantation of own cryostored spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is a promising technique for fertility restoration when the SSC pool has been depleted.In this regard, cryopreservation of pre-pubertal testicular tissue or SSCs suspensions before gonadotoxic therapies is ethically accepted and increasingly proposed.SSC transplantation has also been considered to treat other causes of infertility relying on the possibility of propagat...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a relatively rare genetic condition with primary sequelae of bone marrow failure, hematologic malignancies, and squamous cell cancers (SCC) of head/neck, breast, and anogenital tract. Many patients require hematopoietic stem cell transplant (bone marrow transplant, BMT) to treat marrow dysfunction, but risk of future malignancies remains. Female patients are at risk of reproductive complications, including infertility related to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) and gynecologic cancers.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Infertile couples including cancer survivors stand to benefit from gametes differentiated from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem (ES/iPS) cells. It remains challenging to convert human ES/iPS cells into primordial germ-like cells (PGCLCs) en route to obtaining gametes. Considerable success was achieved in 2016 to obtain fertile offspring starting with mouse ES/iPS cells, however the specification of human ES/iPS cells into PGCLCs in vitro is still not achieved. Human ES cells will not yield patient-specific gametes unless and until hES cells are derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cl...
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers. Diverse interventions that extend mouse lifespan suppress shared age-associated epigenetic changes at critical gene regulatory regions Age-associated epigenetic changes are implicated in aging. Notably, age-associated DNA methylation changes comprise a so-called aging "clock", a robust biomarker of aging. However, while genetic, dietary and drug interventions can extend lifespan, their impact on the epigenome is uncharacterised. To fill this knowledge gap, we defined...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
STUDY QUESTION Is there an association between the need for medical puberty induction and the diagnosis or treatment received in girls who have undergone cryopreservation of ovarian tissue for fertility preservation? SUMMARY ANSWER There was a clear association between the intensity of treatment received and requirement for medical puberty induction but no association with the diagnosis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Although it cannot be predicted which girls will become infertile or develop premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) following intensive chemotherapy or irradiation, patients who are at high risk of POI should be offe...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Puberty, ageing and HRT Source Type: research
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