Infertile Men Have Higher Risk of Diabetes, OsteoporosisInfertile Men Have Higher Risk of Diabetes, Osteoporosis

Low sperm counts may indicate future risk for diabetes and osteoporosis, and affected men should have reproductive hormone levels checked, according to a new study. Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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Abstract Ovarian dysgenesis, short stature, and infertility are common features of Turner syndrome (TS). Endocrinopathies and cardiopathies are less common, but may induce significant complications, and are the leading cause of mortality in TS patients. Endocrine abnormality including osteoporosis occurs in up to 60% of patients, hypothyroidism at an incidence of 3.2%, and impaired glucose metabolism with variable incidence depending on the age group. Estrogen therapy and growth hormone therapy, alone or combined, improve height and bone mass in TS patients. Autoimmune hypothyroidism is prone in the X-isochromosom...
Source: Climacteric - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Climacteric Source Type: research
This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers. Diverse interventions that extend mouse lifespan suppress shared age-associated epigenetic changes at critical gene regulatory regions Age-associated epigenetic changes are implicated in aging. Notably, age-associated DNA methylation changes comprise a so-called aging "clock", a robust biomarker of aging. However, while genetic, dietary and drug interventions can extend lifespan, their impact on the epigenome is uncharacterised. To fill this knowledge gap, we defined...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(The Endocrine Society) The Endocrine Society and Medscape announced today a new partnership that brings together the Society's expertise and Medscape's innovative, peer-to-peer digital platforms and award-winning content to provide clinicians with the latest guidance and most relevant insights on diagnosing and treating diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, infertility, and other endocrine disorders.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news
Dr. Dascha Weir, associate director, Boston Children’s Celiac Disease Program It may be difficult for parents to hear that their child has a chronic illness. When the diagnosis is celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder caused by an intolerance to gluten, there is good news. CD is treatable by changes in diet. How it works: When food enters the stomach, it’s broken down into tiny digestible particles, which then travel through the small intestine. The small intestine is lined with villi — tiny finger-like projections that absorb nutrients from the food passing through. In celiac disease...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions celiac disease Dr. Dascha Weir gluten intolerance Source Type: news
Discussion Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a common genetic abnormaly with a prevalence of 1 in ~650 male births. It was first described in 1942 by Dr. Harry Klinefelter. It is associated with at least one extra X chromosome with the most common karyotype (~80% of patients) being 47 XXY. Other karyotypes are seen along with mosaicism. It is believed that although it is very prevalent, only about 25-33% of people with KS are identified. About 10% are identified before puberty with the rest usually identified because of hypogonadism and tall stature especially in teenage years or due to infertility in adulthood. KS is diagnosed...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Discussion Turner Syndrome (TS) is one of the most common genetic disorders in females. It was first described by Dr. Henry H. Turner in 1938. It affects 1 in 2000-2500 births and ~70,000 girls and women have TS in the United States. It is caused by the absence of all or part of the second X chromosome. The most common variation is 45X which affects about 50% of TS patients and usually has the most complications, but there are other variations. Phenotypes vary and therefore the age of diagnosis varies. Mean age of diagnosis unfortunately is 15 years. Diagnosis is made by chromosomal analysis. Haploinsufficiency of the SHOX...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, and osteoporosis are endocrine conditions affecting a significant proportion of women presenting to the obstetrician-gynecologist. Obstetrician-gynecologists are often the first health-care providers that young women see in adulthood, and thus, have a critical opportunity to identify women at risk for gestational and overt diabetes and manage the condition in those who have developed it. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be aware of the appropriate therapeutic options and treatment goals (eg, hemoglobin A1c) for women with diabetes. Thyroid disorders often present with menstrual irr...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Men with low sperm counts are at a higher risk of metabolic disease in later years, according to a study presented at the European Association of Urology 2016 Congress in Munich, and recently published in Clinical Endocrinology. WedMD
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
ConclusionsThe disease burden model highlights gaps in evidence, particularly regarding intensity of care and adrenal crisis, and the relationship between control of CAH and risks of CVD, osteoporosis, diabetes and infertility. The model can be used for research on the impact of new clinical pathways and therapeutic interventions in terms of clinical events and cost.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Clinical Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Summary The Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder in males, characterized by at least one supernumerary X chromosome (most frequent karyotype 47,XXY). This syndrome presents with a broad range of phenotypes. The common characteristics include small testes and infertility, but KS subjects are at increased risk of hypogonadism, cognitive dysfunction, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and autoimmune disorders, which are present in variable proportion. Although part of the clinical variability might be linked to a different degree of testicular function observed in KS patien...
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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